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Pregnancy & Your Gum Health


Posted on Jul 09, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Today’s American female has a long list of guidelines that enhance the potential to have a healthy, full-term baby. Even so, pre-term births in this country occur at a rather high rate for the advanced health care available to most.

According to data released in 2017 by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), the U.S. preterm birth rate actually rose from 2015 -2016, from 9.6 percent of births to 9.8 percent.

There seems to be a rather close connection between gum disease and preterm babies, as unrelated as the two may seem. First, consider the risks cited by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). As far back as the year 2000, the Surgeon General warned that pregnant females who had gum disease had a far greater risk of a pre-term, low birth weight baby.

Research has shown that gum disease increases the risk for pre-term delivery (prior to 37 weeks) and low birth weight babies (less than 5.5 lbs.).

“Studies have found that expectant mothers with periodontal disease are up to seven times more likely to deliver premature, low birth weight babies.” (https://www.adha.org/resources-docs/7228_Oral_Health_Total.pdf)

One study showed the preterm birth rate for pregnant women with moderate to severe periodontal disease to be nearly 29%.

Estimates are that over half of pregnant women have some form of gingivitis (gum inflammation, an early stage of gum disease) or periodontitis (infectious, advanced gum disease). Nearly a third of pregnant females will acquire gum disease because of their higher vulnerability to inflammation.

Infections in the mother have been identified as increasing the risk for pregnancy complications. Due to varying hormone levels, nearly all females will develop gingivitis during their pregnancy.

Referred to as pregnancy gingivitis, symptoms include swollen, tender gums that bleed easily when brushing. The goal is to halt the inflammation before it progresses to a more infectious stage.

Most obstetricians now urge their pregnant patients (or those trying to conceive) to have a thorough periodontal examination. Even with no obvious signs, gum disease can still exist. It lies beneath the surface of the gum tissues and should be resolved before it worsens and is able to seep into the bloodstream.

Symptoms of gum disease include gums that bleed when brushing, swollen or tender gums, receded gums or gums that darken in color.

When periodontal disease is present, successful treatment has shown to lower the risk of preterm births. A periodontal specialist is trained to treat all levels of disease in a way that is safe for pregnant women (as well as all patients).

Pregnancy is not the sole risk factor for developing gum disease, of course. Most adults of both genders have at least one factor that heightens susceptibility to this oral infection. Among these are stress, poor diet with high sugar intake, smoking, obesity, age, and poor dental hygiene can all contribute to an increased potential for developing periodontal disease.

Other risk factors include clinching or grinding teeth, predisposition due to genetics, diseases such as diabetes or cancer, some medications, and changes in female estrogen levels (puberty, pregnancy, menopause).

Gum disease bacteria is obviously a potent threat to any individual. As the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss, oral bacteria of this disease have been linked to heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure and impotency.

If you have symptoms associated with gum disease, schedule an appointment at your earliest convenience by calling 828-274-9440. Gum disease will only worsen without treatment.

Considering Dental Implants? Why A Specialist Should Be Your Choice.


Posted on Jun 22, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

With added safety precautions and appointment protocols, our Asheville periodontal dental office has resumed a full schedule. And, we are busy!

In spite of the challenges surrounding a global pandemic, people are still in need of treatment for gum disease. Especially now. Gum disease is an inflammatory disease that is an added burden to the immune system. Because our immune systems need to be operating at peak levels to fight infection, healthy gums are being given renewed recognition.

As a periodontist, I also specialize in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. We continue to provide this much needed option to patients in need of replacing teeth. After all, regardless of the challenges people face, they still need to be able to bite, chew, and speak.

When it comes to a partial or bridge to replace teeth, a patient faces future risks. Because a partial or bridge rely on adjacent teeth for support, the natural tooth (teeth) that serve to support these appliances bring on a significant challenge.

These dental prosthetics place added pressure and stress to the supporting natural teeth. Thus, there is a greater potential for damage to the structure of the natural teeth. This places those “crowned” teeth at risk for being the next to be lost.

Americans are coming to know that a denture creates a great many challenges. One of the most common complaints has to do with dentures that begin to move or ‘slip’ when eating or even speaking. This is due to bone loss that is occurring under the denture.

Without stimulation to the jaw bone where tooth roots were once supported, the bone begins to shrink. This is known as resorption. As resorption continues, the denture that was designed to the unique shape and height of this gum-covered ‘arch’ no longer provides a snug fit.

Because of this, denture wearers come to rely on denture adhesives and pastes. However, over time even frequent applications of these products are of little help. Relines, another option, can be done to reshape the denture’s base to conform to the shrinking arch. Eventually, even relines provide minimal improvement.

Bone loss also shows up in facial appearance. As the bone structures that give our face its shape start to shrink, deep wrinkles form around the mouth. Eventually, the corners of the mouth will turn downward, even when smiling. Jowls form on each side of the face as facial muscles detach from the declining bone structure.

As the jaw bone continues to shrink, the chin becomes more pointed and the nose seems to move closer to it. This leads to a collapsed mouth, sometimes referred to as a ‘granny look.’ This look ages the appearance of an individual that is far beyond their actual years.

However, the greatest challenge is when eating becomes a struggle. Because of movement and resulting sore spots on tender gum tissues, foods that require biting and rigorous chewing are often set aside for softer foods that dissolve quickly in the mouth.

Unfortunately, these food choices often offer less-than-ideal nutritional benefits, and typically very little fiber. It’s no wonder that denture wearers tend to have more gastrointestinal problems than people who are able to chew sufficiently and comfortably.

To me, what is especially troubling for long-time denture wearers is the avoidance of social gatherings. Studies have shown that being socially involved helps adults be more active both physically and mentally.

In a February 2019 article, Science Daily shared, “Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being.” (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220074610.htm)

When adults fear embarrassing slips, clicks, or uncomfortable food pieces that become trapped between the gums and denture, declining social invitations becomes more and more frequent. Since many social gatherings include food or are centered around meals, denture-wearing adults have difficult choices to make. Go and hope for the best or risk an embarrassing moment?

As dental implants have become a more practical and popular option, adults are turning away from dentures, partials, or bridges. In addition to restoring biting and chewing comfort and stability, implants offer a lifetime replacement option that actually enhances the well-being and lifespan of surrounding teeth.

In dental implant treatment, the ‘implanted’ portion is positioned into the jaw bone as a tooth root replacement. This provides the attached teeth the same foundation as natural tooth roots have. This also recreates stimulation to the bone, halting the process of bone loss.

So, why should you search out a periodontist for your dental implant treatment? With so many one-stop clinics and online implant “special price today only!”, is the care of a periodontal specialist really needed?

Below are some reasons to consider how your dental implant treatment begins. Because, in the long run, it is a significant factor in the end result.

• Proper diagnosis: A periodontal specialist has advanced training to properly diagnose and place the most appropriate dental implant system for your needs and goals.
• Appropriate treatment: I have a reputation for never over-treating or under-treating. We structure treatment to provide the most successful outcome based on each patient’s unique needs by the most conservative means possible. Thus, the patient avoid having more time and expense than is necessary.
• Proper tools & equipment: As a periodontal office, we are fully prepared for the diagnosis and treatment of all stages of gum disease as well as the placement of dental implants. As such, we can tend to our patients in an efficient and effective manner. This also enables us to provide treatment in minimal time and to an exceptional level of comfort.
• Advanced features: In addition to trust, one of the reasons we receive so many referrals from physicians, dentists, and past/present patients has to do with the advanced technology and features we provide. We are also known for providing a high level of patient comfort through the administration of IV sedation (twilight sleep) with our on-site Board Certified Anesthesiologist. Additionally, diagnosis and treatment planning is backed by images from our on-site 3D Cone Beam technology.
• A respectful environment: We treat each patient with the same respect, compassion and gentle hands that we would want for ourselves and our loved ones. We take great pride in knowing our patients experience the finest periodontal and implant care available in the Southeastern United States.

Because of their ability to restore the presence of natural teeth to such a great extent, the dental profession now sees dental implants as the preferred choice for replacement for most patients. Although the overall treatment costs may seem greater initially, over time, it becomes obvious that the benefits far outweigh the expense.

When you consider that dental implants are designed to last a lifetime, the investment is a wise one. There are very little things in this day and age that will last as long as we do!

If you are considering dental implants, increase your potential for a successful outcome by asking a Periodontist to join your dentist in team treatment. Most general dentists have close relationships with periodontal specialists for implant placement and in treating gum disease.

Before you make your decision, you may wish to schedule a consultation to discuss your specific needs and desires. We are always happy to welcome new patients and being referred is not required. Call 828-274-9440.

Missing Teeth Can Lead To Facial Bone Loss


Posted on Jun 09, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

For people who need to replace missing teeth, they are seeking the restoration of their smile’s appearance and the ability to eat. Some look into dentures or partials. Yet, when people are initially fitted for these dental prosthetics, there is often no warning of what is to come.

There are many reasons why dentures don’t have a great reputation. Most individuals have heard many of the common complaints that come with them. These include movement when biting or chewing, sore spots on tender gum tissues, drooling, uneasiness when speaking or eating during social settings, and having to remove them at bedtime.

Dentures have been around for many centuries, even before Christ (B.C. years). Although a famous trait of George Washington was his ‘wooden teeth,’ dentures have been significantly improved over the years. (By the way, according to Mount Vernon Museum, Washington had dentures made of materials such as ivory, gold and lead, but not wood. (Mt. Vernon Museum)

A denture’s “false teeth” are supported by a gum-colored base. The base that holds these artificial teeth is often made out of a resin or a more flexible polymer material. This is designed to fit the unique shape of the ‘arch’ where tooth roots were once held. This arch is actually the protruding portion of upper or lower jaw bone, covered over by gum tissues.

Replacement teeth are commonly made of the same resin or polymer as the base, colored and shape to mimic teeth. However, this material can easily chip or crack if dropped. The material also wears down, requiring replacement every 5-7 years, as recommended by the American Dental Association (ADA). This is because the denture’s fit changes year after year.

Let’s go back to before you lost your teeth for a moment. When natural teeth are present, the jaw bones that support their roots are nourished and nurtured. After tooth roots are removed from the bone, the jaw bones begin to shrink. This causes the arch to flatten out, which causes dentures to slip and move, especially when eating.

As the arch (or “ridge”) loses height, the fit becomes less and less secure. More-frequent applications of denture adhesives or pastes are needed. Relines can be done to re-contour the denture’s base to conform to the individual’s declining arch. However, the declining arch height will continue, requiring periodic relines and, eventually, a new denture. And more relines, and so on and so on.

To add to the frustrations of the denture’s fit, food choices typically change to softer foods that dissolve quickly in the mouth. Laughter becomes overshadowed with concern over embarrassing slips. Social invitations aren’t as readily accepted.

Changes in facial appearance also take place when bone structures shrink. For example, as the jaw bone thins, deep wrinkles form around the mouth. The corners of the mouth will start to turn down, even in a smile. Jowls form on each side of the face as facial muscles detach from the shrinking bone structure.

As the jaw bone declines further, the chin becomes more pointed and the nose seems to get closer to it. This leads to a collapsed mouth that is known as a “granny look.” This look ages the appearance of an individual far beyond their actual years.

As an Asheville periodontist, my dental specialty includes the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Dental implants are the closest thing to natural teeth.

Among the benefits of dental implants, they provide stimulation to the jaw bone. This helps to halt the process of bone loss. For those who have already lost a great deal of bone, bone rebuilding procedures can be performed to restore a healthy, more youthful facial shape.

Dental implants restore the ability to bite and chew comfortably and without worry. Because implants are placed in the jaw bone, they provide the same dependable foundation as that once enjoyed with natural teeth.

Keep in mind that most implant types today are non-removable. You’ll be able to brush your teeth in your mouth again, laugh with friends, and eat the foods you love – without worry.

Dental implants are also designed to last a lifetime. They can last as long as you do! With the help of dental implants, the shape of your face and the strength of your jaw bone can be preserved long after tooth loss.

Call 828-274-9440 to schedule a consultation to discuss dental implants.

 

We Are Seeing Patients Again With New Appointment Protocols


Posted on May 20, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Lately, when people see a hospital worker on television news, healthcare workers have on layers of garb that we’re unaccustomed to seeing. Hopefully, in time, all this protective layering won’t be needed. For now, it’s in line with proper precautions for the safety of both patients and staff.

We are seeing patients again!

As established periodontists in Asheville, it has been a pleasure for Dr. Boyland and I to be able to open our doors again for patient care. And, our schedule is full! Patients in need of treatment have been patiently (but anxiously) waiting to resume periodontal therapy and dental implant placement.

However, our reopening brings some new protocols in addition to our already-stringent infection-control measures. Some new steps that patients may notice now in the flow of the appointment, from the check-in process to check-out. Too, patients will see us attired in more layers than before.

As a heads up, our doctors and staff are wearing protective equipment (N95 masks, gowns, face shields, etc.). This protective gear does not interfere with patient communication nor the exceptional care we have always provided.

Other than our “new look,” however, patients will also go through a few new steps, which include:

  • Once patients arrive for scheduled appointments, they are asked to call our main number (828-274-9440) from their vehicles. Our receptionist will provide the patient with a pre-appointment questionnaire.
  • After we retrieve the completed form, a staff member will escort the patient into the office. (For now, only appointed patients are allowed unless accompanying a child or disabled patient.)
  • Once inside, patients will have their temperature taken and a staff member will escort them to a treatment suite.
  • After care is completed, a staff member will walk the patient to our check-out desk.

In addition, patients can have the peace of mind that our Asheville periodontal office has always adhered to the highest standards of infection control in dentistry. Typical steps that have always been in place include are the sterilization process used on the instruments used in patient care (such as probes).

These pieces are heat sterilized at high temperatures for up to 40 minutes, killing bacteria, viruses and infectious micro-organisms. Once sterile, the instruments are carefully packaged until ready to unwrap for use in the treatment room.

Even the water used (for rinsing or as a spray to manage air particles) comes through water lines that undergo a special “flushing” process. This cleansing process dislodges and eliminates biofilm that can occur when minuscule particles attach to the interior of these lines. Thus, the water sprayed in your mouth during certain procedures is delivered so bacteria levels are at such a low point they are virtually non-existent.

After each patient is seen, treatment chairs, lighting, and any equipment the patient or staff come in contact with are thoroughly wiped down.

These steps have always been done to ensure the safety and well-being of our patients as well as our doctors and staff. Yet, now more than ever, we have a unique mindset in everything we do.

While the vast majority of patients seen feel very comfortable in our office and infection control steps being taken, we encourage questions or concerns so we can explain, reassure or even reschedule those who are still uneasy about close contact. Just call us at 828-274-9440. Our friendly front staff will be happy to assist you.

What’s most important is that you stay safe while keeping your oral health at its best. The progression from poor oral hygiene to gingivitis to full-blown periodontal disease is faster than many people realize.

Be sure to brush at least twice a day for at least minutes per brushing. Brush your tongue with your toothbrush once a day (especially towards the back where most bacteria hide out) and floss daily. Keep your mouth moist and limit sugar. Use an oral rinse that contains no alcohol as an added measure to minimize oral bacterial buildup.

Let’s all emerge from this odd time in our history with smiles that are healthy, accompanied by hugs!