Why Seek A Periodontist For Dental Implants


Posted on Jul 13, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Like many people, I value my relationship with my Internist. Through his care, I am confident that he understands my specific needs to oversee all aspects of my health.

Some of this care occasionally involves being referred to a specialist. For example, my Internist may advise me to see a dermatologist for a particular skin condition. Together, my internist and the dermatologist are able to work in unison so I’m receiving the proper treatment plan according to my particular needs.

I am also a specialist in the dental field. I am a periodontist, which is a specialist who receives most patients through referrals by a general dentist or another dental specialist. This is because a periodontist offers a unique set of skills as well as an advanced level of understanding when it comes to oral tissues and dental implants.

The American Academy of Periodontology defines a Periodontist as: “A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal disease, and in the placement of dental implants. Periodontists are also experts in the treatment of oral inflammation. Periodontists receive extensive training in these areas, including three additional years of education beyond dental school. They are familiar with the latest techniques for diagnosing and treating periodontal disease, and are also trained in performing cosmetic periodontal procedures.”

(https://www.perio.org/consumer/what-is-a-periodontist)

To reach this specialty requires an individual to be highly committed. A periodontist begins education by completing 4 years of college (undergraduate training) and then continues another 4 years in dental school to earn a doctorate. To specialize in Periodontics, he or she must further their education for another 3-4 years before completing the stringent requirements for a specialty certification in periodontics.

In addition to treating all phases of periodontal (gum) disease, a periodontal specialist is uniquely qualified to reshape gum tissues. This may be performed to correct a “gummy smile” or even out a smile line through crown lengthening. Periodontists also specialize in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants.

The advantages of a periodontist in dental implant treatment are multi-faceted. This specialist is trained to understand the intricate concepts involved in selecting the proper type of implant and skilled at placing implants at proper depths and angles. A periodontist is also able to optimize patient comfort during treatment and throughout the healing phase.

Using his or her advanced training in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants, a periodontist can help you enjoy a higher potential for dental implant treatment that lasts a lifetime. There are a number of reasons you should strongly consider having a periodontal specialist involved in dental implant treatment, including:

SELECTION OF IMPLANTS – Dental implants come in a wide array of shapes and sizes. Each system is designed to accommodate certain needs and preferences. For example, some implants are designed to support a full arch of teeth while others can be placed in areas where a great deal of bone loss has occurred. The selection of the implant type that is appropriate for your needs and goals requires a unique understanding of all implant types. That is, a periodontist can select the type that will work best for you rather than go with the one or two in which they have received training.

PLACEMENT OF IMPLANTS – In addition to selecting the best type for your needs, proper placement of implants has a great deal to do with having a successful outcome. When an implant that is too long, for instance, is placed in bone that is too shallow, it can have future repercussions that may require its removal. This could occur when a lower implant is placed too close to a nerve that runs horizontal through the jaw bone (mandible). Or, when an upper implant is placed in shallow bone, it can work its way into the sinus cavity. A periodontal specialist considers intricate factors that can effect your potential for success.

STRUCTURAL ISSUES – In addition to the factors involved with bone loss, other issues can ‘make or break’ having a successful treatment outcome with dental implants. For example, for people who have bite misalignment or TMJ disorders, they may be grinding or clenching their teeth during sleep – often unknowingly. Telltale signs of ‘bruxing’ including remaining, natural teeth that are chipped or worn. These forces are enough to crack a walnut. When dental implants endure these forces, especially during their ‘healing’ phase, there is greater risk for implant failure. A periodontist considers these issues prior to your treatment, helping you to bypass problems that can result in eventual removal.

INDIVIDUALIZED TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS – Our goal is to help you get the most from your dental implants. When there are individual habits or preferences that can complicate success, we work with each patient to help them enjoy their dental implants for a lifetime. For smokers, we advise ways to support saliva flow and minimize oral bacteria levels. For people who take certain medications that can interfere with oral moisture, we recommend methods to keep the mouth properly hydrated. And so on. We want to make sure your care is individualized so your potential for implant success is high!

OPTIMAL COMFORT – For added comfort and relaxation, we offer Oral sedation or I.V. sedation (twilight sleep) for most procedures for those who want or need these options. Both sedations are administered to the highest standards of safety possible. Our sedated patients are closely monitored throughout treatment with advanced safety equipment and trained professionals. Oral sedation is a pill that helps patients relax. It also has an amnesiac effect, leaving most with little or no memory of treatment afterward.  I.V. sedation places the patient in a deeper sedative state, also erasing memory of the procedure. At our Asheville office, Biltmore Periodontics administers sedation with the involvement of a highly-trained doctor of anesthesiology for optimal comfort and safety.

For individuals who wish to replace one or more missing teeth, it makes sense that dental implants have become the leading preference. Dental implants restore the look, feel, and function like that of natural teeth. They also help to prevent bone shrinkage that occurs when tooth roots are no longer present in the jaw bone. This process is known as resorption.

Resorption is what contributes to changes in facial appearance when the bone structures that give the face its shape start to shrink. When tooth roots no longer exist in the jaw bone, the stimulation once provided to the bone no longer exists. This causes the bone to shrink, or ‘resorb.’

As the bone mass declines in height and thins out, changes in facial appearance slowly evolve. For example, as the jaw bone thins, deep wrinkles form around the mouth. Eventually, the corners of the mouth will turn down even in a smile. Jowls form on each side of the face as facial muscles detach from the shrinking bone structure.

As the jaw bone continues to shrink, the chin becomes more pointed and the nose seems to get closer to it. This leads to a collapsed mouth that is known as a ‘granny look.’ This look ages the appearance of an individual far beyond their actual years.

Among the many benefits of dental implants, they also provide stimulation to the jaw bone. This helps to halt the process of bone loss. For those who have already lost a great deal of bone, bone rebuilding procedures can be performed to restore a healthy, more youthful face shape.

In addition to all the advantages of care through a periodontist, our Asheville periodontal office features some of the most advanced technology available. This includes laser dentistry and cone beam imaging as well as highly-advanced computerized options.

If you’ve considered dental implants to replace missing teeth, we invite you to consult with us during a private consultation appointment. A referral is not necessary. During this time, we will discuss your needs and goals as well as any concerns regarding comfort or costs.

To schedule, call (828) 274-9440.

 

 

 

 

Arthritis? Recommit Yourself To Having Good Oral Health.


Posted on Jun 20, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

According to the Centers For Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), over 47 percent of American adults are living with some level of gum disease. For those age 65 and older, this figure jumps to 70 percent.

These concerning statistics are nothing to ignore. Although gum disease is so common, it increases risks that go far beyond the mouth. Over the years, research has tracked many diseases and conditions that correlate with gum disease bacteria. The inflammatory reactions triggered by these infectious bacteria have been linked to heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, preterm babies, and impotency.

Research has also shown a notably close relationship between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). These studies have been ongoing for many years, and the findings should be concerning to all adults.

RA is a debilitating, painful disease that destroys joints. RA often emerges gradually, initially causing morning stiffness and weak, sore muscles. As inflammation from RA worsens, joints become swollen.  Joints become achy and stiff most often in the fingers, wrists, elbows, hips, knees, ankles, toes and neck. Unfortunately, there is no cure for RA.

On a positive note, studies have shown that treating RA patients who have periodontal disease helps to improve RA symptoms. It is felt that this occurs because of a lighter burden of oral inflammation to the body’s immune system.

Below are some of the findings you may want to review. First, however, it’s important to understand how gum disease begins and some signs and symptoms.

In the initial stage of periodontal (gum) disease, known as gingivitis, the gums may bleed when brushing. Bad breath is more frequent and the gums may be tender or swollen. As the disease progresses, the gums turn red and may pull away from the base of some teeth.

Bad breath becomes persistent and pus pockets may form at the base of some teeth. As the infectious bacteria attack the bone structures that support tooth roots, teeth will begin to loosen and may need removal. Gum disease is the leading cause of adult tooth loss in the U.S.

In addition to the devastating damage in the mouth, the infectious bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream through diseased gum tissues, causing the inflammatory triggers that activate serious health problems, such as RA.

Years ago, researchers noticed an RA-perio trait among people with rheumatoid arthritis. While RA sufferers had gum disease more often, they observed that people with gum disease tended to have RA more often.

As researchers delved deeper into the connection, it appeared that the association is much more complicated than previously thought. Findings now suggest that oral bacteria could actually be a cause of rheumatoid arthritis.

In the past, doctors felt that periodontal disease was a result of RA itself since stiff, painful hands make it challenging to maintain good oral hygiene. They also suspected that medications prescribed to treat RA could be a factor since the drugs, which suppress the immune system, inhibited the body’s ability to fight harmful oral bacteria.

Both conditions cause chronic inflammation in tissues that connect to bone with both diseases having a similar inflammatory trigger. Even more similar is the particular species of bacteria found in periodontally-diseased tissues when compared with tissues around  arthritic joints. In one study, a particular pathogen associated with periodontal disease was found to activate the same destructive process of rheumatoid arthritis.

In 2017, study findings were released by Johns Hopkins University Division of Rheumatology, which noted evidence that the tissues in the mouth of a periodontally-compromised individual and the tissues of the joint in RA have a number of likenesses. Research has also shown a genetic link between the two.

Above all, these findings reinforce how oral health correlates closely to our overall health. When you consider how the presence of gum disease can significantly increase your risk for serious health conditions, having good oral health should be a priority for every American.

What can you do to lower your risks for tooth loss and contributing to (or worsening) serious health problems? Recommit yourself to thorough oral hygiene at home and having twice-a-year exams and cleanings.

If you have signs of gum disease, have treatment at your earliest convenience. Gum disease will only worsen and requires more treatment time and expense as it progresses.

Call 828-274-9440 to schedule an examination, or begin with a consultation to discuss your needs.

https://www.hopkinsrheumatology.org/2017/01/gum-disease-linked-to-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/conditions/periodontal-disease.html

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17551378/

 

 

 

‘Perio’ Dental Terms


Posted on Jun 14, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Occasionally, I like to remind readers of the benefits of thorough communication in dental offices, and especially in dental specialists‘ offices. When unfamiliar terms are used by the doctor or staff, it can easily leave patients in a confused state.

When patients feel less involved in their dental situation, they struggle to make decisions that are in their best interests, including decisions that can greatly affect long-term dental health.

In our Asheville periodontal dental office, we pride ourselves on providing a comfortable, respectful environment to our patients. We find that even patients who are anxious or “jittery” about dental procedures relax when they feel fully versed as to their needs, how they may have occurred, and their options in resolving the problem(s).

However, some dentists, hygienists, and dental assistants can become “immune” to the foreign nature of some terms. They tend to throw them out without realizing the terms are going askew rather than being absorbed by the patients to whom they’re communicating.

Ideally, any term or explanation that isn’t clear will prompt the patient to ask for clarity.

Below are some fairly common terms you may hear used by your dental caregivers. Hopefully, these will help you better grasp the unique situation you have that brought you to the dental chair in the first place.

PERIODONTAL (or PERIO): Defined, this means relating to or affecting the structures surrounding and supporting the teeth. Generally, however, this refers to the gum tissues in the mouth.

GINGIVITIS: This initial stage of periodontal disease causes inflammation of the gums, typically because a film of plaque (consisting of oral bacteria), has accumulated on teeth. Gingivitis is a non-destructive type of gum disease but, untreated, can progress to more serious levels that are highly destructive.

PERIODONTITIS: This inflammatory reaction is triggered by a buildup of bacteria in dental plaque. This stage of gum disease leads to a loss of tooth-supporting bone, formation of deep “pockets”, and eventually tooth loss.

PROPHY: Also known as a dental cleaning, a prophy is a treatment that involves the cleaning and polishing of tooth surfaces to control bacteria on the teeth and just below the gum line. A prophy is recommended every six months to maintain healthy gums and teeth.

BUCCAL: This is the cheek-side of teeth. For front teeth, it may also be referred to as the facial surface.

LINGUAL: The opposite of buccal, this refers to the surface of teeth that face the tongue.

MESIAL: This is the surface of a tooth that is closest to the midline of the face.

OCCLUSAL: This is the chewing surface of back teeth.

POCKETS: This is a small opening in gum tissues between the gums and the teeth where the gum should normally fit snugly against the tooth. A pocket holds bacteria, which can allow infection to penetrate below the gum line.

DEBRIDEMENT: When a buildup of plaque and calculus becomes imbedded around the gums and between teeth, a dentist or dental specialist often must remove it in order to perform a thorough oral exam.

ROOT PLANING: This is a non-surgical procedure for the removal of plaque, hardened tartar ( calculus), and/or stains from a patient’s teeth and tooth roots. This is typically performed to reach oral bacteria that has moved below the gum line.

MAXILLA: This is your upper jaw, which holds upper tooth roots. This bone is part of the skull structure and does not move.

MANDIBLE: This is the lower jaw bone, where lower teeth are held. This bone is hinged to the skull and moves up and down and slightly sideways, made possible by the temporomandibular joints (TMJ).

ARCH or RIDGE: In dentistry, this refers to the raised, gum covered “u” that supports the upper or lower teeth. For example, a “full arch of teeth” indicates a complete row of all upper or lower teeth.

Our goal is to create informed patients who are active in their care and decision-making process for having excellent dental health.

Research has shown that a healthy mouth supports a healthy body. It has proven that oral health is intricately connected to our whole health. By minimizing the level of bacteria in the mouth, you can avoid many problems associated with the teeth and gums AND give your overall health added support.

Bacteria accumulation can sneak up on you. Gum disease symptoms begin with tender gums that may bleed when brushing. The gums may become red (versus a healthy pink color) and pull away from the base of teeth. Bad breath becomes more frequent and some swelling may occur.

As it progresses, periodontal disease can cause deep, pus filled pockets to form on the gums. The gums may loosen from their grip around teeth and bad breath is persistent. Bleeding gums may occur easily; even eating may prompt bleeding.

Eventually, the bone and tissue structures that support teeth are so damaged that the foundation for teeth gives way and teeth may need to be extracted. Gum disease is the nation’s leading cause for adult tooth loss.

If gum disease exists, it will only worsen without treatment. Please contact our Western NC periodontal office to arrange a consultation or a complete examination. A periodontist specializes in the treatment of oral tissues and is your best choice for restoring a healthy mouth.

Call 828-274-9440. Let’s get you smiling confidently, and often!

Don’t Smoke? Living Or Working With A Smoker Creates Higher Risks Than Once Thought.


Posted on May 14, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

I doubt there is anyone in the U.S. who smokes tobacco who is unaware of the fact that it’s an unhealthy habit. Although the heart and lungs are more widely associated with the health risks of smoking, many people miss the fact that it is also damaging to the tissues in the mouth.

Consider the devastating statistics of COVID-19 related deaths in the U.S., nearing the 600,000 mark. Yet, when it comes to your oral health, cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States. For people who don’t smoke but live or work with a smoker, secondhand smoke exposure accounts for over 41,000 of these.

For nonsmokers who are victims of secondhand smoke, that’s a tough statistic to accept.

Just how harmful is secondhand smoke? British researchers recently released some interesting findings along these lines. Their studies included several major countries and tracked nearly 7,000 adults, with nearly half being exposed to secondhand smoke. The findings showed that breathing in the smoke of another person’s cigarette can increase the risk of oral cancer by more than 50 percent. These cancers include lip, mouth and throat cancers.

On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers. For every person who dies because of smoking, at least 30 people live with a serious illness related to smoking. Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body.

When considering the mouth, smoking can create costly problems in addition to a higher risk of tooth loss.

Twenty years of research shows that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for periodontitis. A smoker is 2 – 3 times as likely to develop periodontitis, which is an advanced stage of gum disease. In addition to increased prevalence, smokers also experience greater severity of gum disease.

Nicotine (in any form) has been shown to reduce blood flow in the gum tissues in the mouth. Pipe smoking can be worse than cigarettes due to the higher temperatures generated in the upper jaw. When it comes to dental implants, smoking is a risk factor for failure. It is also detrimental for conventional bridgework.

Cigarette smoking has long been associated with serious oral conditions, including periodontal (gum) disease, bone loss, tissue loss, and tooth loss. For smokers who opt for dental implants to replace missing teeth, they have a higher risk of peri-implantitis, which is inflammation of the soft and hard gum tissues surrounding a dental implant. To no surprise, smokers have a higher incidence of dental implant failure.

In an article published by the Journal of International’s Society of Preventive & Community Dentistry as far back as 2012, it warned that smoking can impact the rate of dental implant success, accounting for up to 20 percent of failures.

“Clinical trials of endosseous implants consistently rate smoking as a primary patient-centered risk factor for implant loss.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3894084/

It is common knowledge that the nicotine in cigarettes, e-cigs and ‘chew’ is an addictive drug. Some concerning quotes shared by the Oral Cancer Foundation are:

“Scientists have found that nicotine is as addictive as heroin, cocaine or amphetamines, and for most people, more addictive than alcohol,” states the article “Nicotine, Harder to Kick than Heroin,” published in the New York Times Magazine.

“Nicotine is similar in all critical measures to prototypic drugs of abuse such as cocaine, morphine and heroin.”

“Nicotine is a poison used as an insecticide.”

https://oralcancerfoundation.org/understanding/tobacco/tobacco-and-addiction/

Now, knowing the effects of secondhand smoke are likened to the non-smoking “victim” as inhaling half as many cigarettes as the user they live or work with, smokers should consider their habit in a different light.

While our Asheville periodontal dental office does not lecture or “guilt” our patients in any way, we feel they deserve to know the hazards of any risk factor related to the well being of their oral health. Without a doubt, smoking (whether cigarettes or vaping) is harmful to oral tissues and the potential to keep natural teeth.

In a report shared by Delta Dental, smokers are about twice as likely to lose their teeth than non-smokers, according to two 30-year studies at Tufts University in Boston. Their findings showed that men who smoke lose about 3 teeth for every 10 years of smoking, with women losing an average of 1.5 teeth per decade.

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/teethinpack.html

Every year, about half of smokers make some attempt at kicking the habit. Yet, only 6 or so percent are fully successful. All the while, the tobacco industry spends BILLIONS of dollars each year on cigarette and smokeless tobacco advertising and promotions.

According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), in 2018 “$9.06 billion was spent on advertising and promotion of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco combined—about $25 million every day.” That’s more than $1 million dollars spent every hour of every day.

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/economics/econ_facts/index.htm

While nicotine addiction means big money to the tobacco industry, it is enormously costly to our population. Now, knowing that secondhand smoke is so harmful to others, I hope our smoker patients will welcome our respectful support in their efforts to quit as we help them to maintain good oral health and keep their teeth (or dental implants) healthy for a lifetime of confident smiles.

If you’ve considered dental implants to replace missing teeth and smoke, please consult with us to discuss ways we can help you minimize the potential for dental implant failure. We want you to reap the benefits of a smile you’ll want to share proudly.

Call 828-274-9440 to schedule.

 

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