Is Your Denture Increasing Your Risk For The Flu?


Posted on Nov 14, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

“Did you get your flu shot yet?”

Like every year, flu season is here. And part of the prevention measures many people take to avoid it are having their annual flu shot. Hopefully, this quick injection will help individuals to build up a resistance to getting it.

Even with this shot, however, a certain amount of people still get the flu. And, for people who have compromised immune systems, the flu can be a difficult illness to overcome. For some, it can lead to hospitalization and even death.

According to Harvard Health Publishing (https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/10-flu-myths): in the United States alone, 36,000 people die and more than 200,000 are hospitalized each year because of the flu”.

Although we take precautions, such as washing hands and covering our mouths when we sneeze, germs are everywhere – especially in colder months when air circulates in more closed-in spaces.

When it comes to germs, an often overlooked source of germs are dentures and partials. Dentures, because of their gum-colored bases are porous, can be coated with a sticky bacteria known as biofilm. It has been found that this biofilm can harbor MRSA or bacteria that is resistant to antibiotics.

One study, published in the Journal of The American Dental Association, was conducted to determine methods to effectively kill bacteria in the material that make up the gum base of dentures and partials. The results, reported on by NBC News in 2012, revealed how truly serious these bacteria levels were.  (https://www.nbcnews.com/healthmain/dirty-dentures-dangerous-mrsa-may-be-lurking-dentists-say-662637)

According to the report, dentures are “covered with thin layers of icky, sticky bacteria known as biofilms. Worse, some of the biofilm germs may be bad bugs such as MRSA, or drug-resistant staphylococcus aureus bacteria, which can lurk on the dentures until they’re breathed into the lungs, where experts fear they may cause nasty, hard-to-treat infections.”

The problems and risks don’t stop there. When bacteria in the mouth are breathed into the lungs, infections become much more difficult to treat. This is especially concerning due to the high number of denture and partial wearers who sleep in their appliances.

One study found that wearing dentures while sleeping doubles the risk of pneumonia in elderly adults. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541085/) While sleeping in dentures obviously increases health risks, these icky organisms can create quite an obstacle to adults who have immune systems that are already compromised.

Just because we don’t see the actions of organisms that are housed inside our bodies, we must not forget that bacteria are there – living, eating and waste-producing. The tiny hide-outs of denture ‘pores’ give oral bacteria an ideal environment to thrive and reproduce.

With the additional frustrations of wearing dentures and partials, it’s no surprise that dental implants have become the preferred choice of today’s adult when it comes to replacing natural teeth.

Dental implants are held by the jaw bone, restoring a sturdy foundation for biting and chewing. They also recreate stimulation to the bone that supports them, thus halting the rate of bone loss that occurs from wearing dentures. And, dental implants are designed to last a lifetime, making them an excellent investment.

As a Periodontist, my specialty includes advanced training in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Over the years, I have been impressed with their track record, having one of the highest of all implant-in-bone success rates.

Why worry over the health risks associated with wearing dentures and partials? Dental implants are dependable, safe, lasting, and provide a natural look and feel. Call 828-274-9440 to schedule an appointment to determine if dental implants are right for you.

 

 

Missing Teeth Should Be Replaced For The GOOD Of Overall Well-Being.


Posted on Oct 22, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Sometimes, it’s what we can’t see that can do the most harm.

A surprising example of that is wearing dentures. While dentures and partial dentures do replace the presence of teeth, they actually have a detrimental effect on what lies beneath.

If you remove your denture, you can actually SEE what’s going on.

For people who have worn dentures or partials for ten years or more, the appliance has applied pressure to the bone ‘ridge’ that once supported natural teeth. And, without the stimulation of tooth roots in the bone, the jaw begins to decline in mass.

Without the denture in place to “fluff up” the shape of the mouth, a look in the mirror can reveal signs of bone loss. These include:

  • Deep wrinkles around your mouth.
  • The corners of your mouth turn downward, even in a smile.
  • The mouth seems sunken in. Jowls have formed on the sides of the face.
  • The chin seems more pointed than in your youth.
  • The chin may also seem closer to the nose.

This decline in bone occurs when a tooth root is removed from the jaw bone. Without natural tooth roots to nourish and stimulate the root, the process of ‘resorption’ begins.

Additionally, resorption increases risks for tooth loss to neighboring natural teeth. As the jaw bone declines in an area to adjacent tooth roots, these teeth are more vulnerable to cavities, gum disease, and fractures.

It is a fact that when a tooth is lost, the one next to the one missing is most likely the next to be lost.

For people who opt to replace a tooth (or teeth) with a crown-&-bridge, they can also expect bone loss. Over time, this is visible by a gap that seen between the base of the bridge and the natural gum tissues.

As a periodontist, the most common complaint I hear from those who wear dentures or partials is having discomfort while eating. Many long-time denture and partial wearers experience sore spots on tender gum tissues. This occurs because their appliances move when chewing certain foods.

This movement is the result of the declined bone mass that supports the denture. This gum-covered ‘ridge’ where teeth were once held flattens as the jaw bone declines in height and mass. Because a denture or partial is made to contour to this ridge, it begins to slip as the bone shrinks. This is when people tend to use denture adhesives and pastes more frequently.

To avoid discomfort when eating, denture wearers begin to alter their food selections, opting for soft foods that dissolve quickly in the mouth without having to chew. In many cases, these choices lack the fiber, vitamins, minerals and protein needed for proper nutrition.

To no surprise, denture wearers are known to take more medications and have more gastrointestinal problems than non-denture wearers. Yet, the problems of “slippery” or “wobbly” dentures can affect social involvement as well.

Due to fear of embarrassing slips, denture wearers begin to decline social gatherings where food is the centerpiece. Social involvement is a healthy part of keeping our brains and bodies active, which is a positive part of aging.

It stands to reason that there is a need to replace more than the mere presence of teeth. This is why so many dentists and dental specialists now recommend dental implants. For decades now, they have been a dependable option to replace missing natural teeth.

There are many advantages to dental implants. From a health standpoint, I see their ability to halt bone loss as a leading benefit. Dental implants are placed in the jaw bone, recreating the stimulation of tooth roots. This helps to preserve the strength of the jaw bone while restoring biting strength and chewing stability.

I also like that dental implants are self-supporting since they use the jaw bone for support. They do not rely on having otherwise-healthy, natural teeth crowned for the mere purpose of supporting replacement teeth (as in crown-&-bridge combinations).

From a value perspective, dental implants are an excellent investment. With proper selection, placement and care, they are designed to last your lifetime. And, it’s an investment you’ll enjoy every day as you comfortably eat foods you love, smile and laugh without worry, and wake up with a smile!

There is much to know as to why keeping your natural teeth is so important. However, when tooth loss does occur, you can protect your health and well-being by replacing them with implants. With dental implants, you are able to avoid the long-term repercussions of bone loss.

When extreme bone loss has occurred, we can restore bone mass through several methods. One uses a bone-rebuilding material that generates new growth. For some patients who have lost bone due to gum disease, our Asheville periodontal dental office also offers LANAP technology (Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure). This advanced technology has been found to stimulate bone regrowth in damaged areas.

Ask about dental implants to restore a natural look and feel while you protect surrounding teeth and bone structure. As a periodontist with advanced training in the diagnosis and placement of all types of implant systems, I can recommend options that will work best for your individual situation.

Call 828-274-9440 to learn more or ask for a consultation to personally discuss your needs and preferences.

Know The Unseen Risks Of Wearing Dentures


Posted on Sep 19, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

As an Asheville periodontist, my goal is to provide each patient with the very best so they can enjoy a healthy, confident smile. For patients who have lost one or more natural teeth, some come to me because they want to avoid ending up having to wear a full or partial denture. For those who wear one and are unhappy with the feel and function, we are sought out as specialists in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants.

Denture wearers, especially those who have worn dentures for many years, can quickly become dissatisfied with the uncomfortable rubbing and difficulty eating foods they once enjoyed. Although their ‘appliance’ may have fit well when first made, changes in the fit, over time, are due to what is taking place below the gum tissues. These changes aren’t obvious, at first.

When first made, a denture is custom-designed to fit snugly to the unique contours of the gum ridge. This ‘ridge’ is the raised arch where natural teeth were once held. Over time, denture wearers begin to notice that the denture moves while chewing certain foods. This can rub sore spots on gums. As the denture loosens more, even using denture adhesives or pastes don’t help much.

Denture patients also learn that it can be painful for something as small as a sesame seed to become trapped between their denture and gums, piercing into tender gum tissues. Some people eventually switch to a diet of soft foods that dissolve easily to avoid rigorous chewing. Because of fear of embarrassing slips, others begin to decline social invitations when they are centered around food.

The problem for a denture wearer is what is happening underneath the gums. The looser fit is not because the denture has expanded – it’s the decline of the jaw bone. This occurs with the absence of tooth roots, which once provided nourishment and stimulation to the bone that supported them.

When natural tooth roots are removed, the jaw bone begins to shrink. This decline in bone mass also contributes to changes in facial appearance, such as deep wrinkling around the mouth and the formation of jowls.

The process of bone loss continues as the gum ridge your denture was contoured to flattens. Relines may temporarily adjust the denture to accommodate some of the change. However, as the jaw bone continues to decline, the denture continues to be difficult to keep in place.

The denture itself merely adds to the problem of bone loss. The pressure of wearing a denture actually accelerates the rate of bone loss. Since a number of denture wearers also sleep in their dentures, the 24/7 pressure speeds this rate even more.

Long-time denture wearers often complain that they are not able to chew, with some admitting they have to even remove their denture to eat. Fear of embarrassment is another common complaint. Speaking, laughing and even sneezing in the presence of others can create embarrassing moments that leave lasting impressions.

The solution to these problems – dental implants. Not only do implants restore the ability to bite and chew comfortably, they halt bone loss that is associated with dentures. Because they are held by the jaw bone, just as natural tooth roots once were, implants recreate the stimulation needed by the jaw bone to maintain its mass.

Does your denture bring to mind words like rocky, wobbly and slippery? If so, the problem will only worsen over time. When people choose dental implants to replace an ill-fitting denture, they can smile, laugh and chew with confidence.

Eating a healthy diet, socializing with friends and family, and feeling confident are essential to a healthy, happy life. Call our friendly Asheville periodontal dental office: 828-254-9440 to schedule an initial appointment. (A referral is not required). During this time, I’ll explain the type of implants that may be best for your needs as well as comfort options, including oral and IV sedation (“twilight sleep”). We are also happy to discuss estimated costs and payment options.

Using A Manual Or Electric Toothbrush Could Make A BIG Difference.


Posted on Sep 11, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

If you use an electric toothbrush, that can help in the prevention of tooth loss. However, it’s but one part of the steps needed for thorough oral hygiene at home.

Findings of an 11 year study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology tracked the oral health of over 2800 adults. Their use of electric toothbrushes was monitored to watch for periodontal disease, cavities, and the number of natural teeth.

Participants were examined in 2002 – 2006, with 18 percent being electric tooth brush users. Follow ups were conducted after six and 11 years. At the time of their 11 year follow up, 37 had converted to using electric toothbrushes.

The study showed electric brushing promoted better gum health and slower progression of gum disease. Electric tooth brushing also related to a reduction in tooth loss by 20 percent (compared to those who brush with manual toothbrushes). The study did not reveal measurable reduction in cavities, however.

Although more adults are using them, their long-term effectiveness has not been proven to be significant. It is suspected that this is due to technique more than the brushing tool itself. For manual brushers, a major hazard with manual brushes is one’s choice of bristles. Stiffer bristles can be very damaging.

If you use a hard bristle tooth brush, you may be damaging tooth enamel and gum tissues. People often feel they need to press down firmly as they brush and use a scrubbing, ‘back & forth’ motion. This action can wear down the protective shell of tooth enamel, leaving teeth more vulnerable to decay.

Another problem with using a hard bristle tooth brush is its ability to damage tender gum tissues. If the bristles on your toothbrush are fanned out after a couple of months, it’s because you are applying too much pressure when brushing.

The ideal technique for brushing teeth is applying gentle pressure on the brush in a swirling motion. By using a circular pattern over both sides of each tooth and along the tops, teeth are cleansed without wearing away gum tissues.

This is where electric toothbrushes can help greatly. Many of the newer models include timers to indicate the time needed for each quadrant of your mouth. This is your teeth divided into 4 sections. They also warn you when you are using too much pressure.

While tooth enamel is important, equally so are the health of your gum tissues. The gums provide a seal around the base of each tooth. This seal helps to prevent the entry of bacteria that can lead to periodontal (gum) disease, which the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

As devastating as tooth loss can be to one’s overall health, as we now know that the bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream. Research has shown this infectious bacteria can trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body, correlating to heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, some cancers, diabetes, arthritis, impotency, preterm babies and more.

Whether using a manual or electric tooth brush, it is necessary to brush twice a day for effective results. In order to thoroughly remove the sticky film of plaque from teeth, you should also brush at least two minutes each time.

Plaque is a buildup of oral bacteria that coats teeth and gums. If not removed daily, it forms a hardened mass of calculus (or tartar) that attaches to teeth. This is what you may feel your hygienist scraping off teeth during cleanings since it cannot be brushed or flossed away.

Another place for oral bacteria to thrive are the grooves in the tongue. These offer a dark, warm and moist environment for bacterial reproduction. To uproot these organisms (that reproduce rapidly), use your toothbrush to brush your tongue after brushing teeth. Be sure to reach the back of the tongue where the majority of oral bacteria are embedded. Swish with water several times after.

Another way to improve gum health, lower cavity risk, and prevent tooth loss is through flossing. It is estimated that only 31 percent of American adults floss on a daily basis. Because brushing cannot dislodge all food particles caught between teeth, daily flossing should be a part of oral hygiene routines.

Flossing removes trapped bits of food remain in the mouth, which feeds oral bacteria and helps them to quickly multiply. Proper flossing is easy for those who are in the habit of it and takes under a minute each day. For those who have problems with manual dexterity or find the maneuver awkward, water flossers are effective alternatives and easy to use.

Practice the recommended techniques mentioned above and you’ll not only do a better job at having a clean mouth, you’ll find your time at the sink requires less effort. If you feel you may be experiencing symptoms of periodontal disease, however, don’t delay. You should be seen at your earliest convenience for treatment since this disease will only worsen over time.

Signs of gum disease include tender gums that bleed easily when brushing, gums that darken in color to red (versus a healthy pink), frequent bad breath, and gums that pull away from teeth (receded gums) and expose darker root areas of the tooth.

If you’ve noticed any of these, please know that the condition will only worsen without treatment. As a periodontist, I specialize in gum tissues (as well as dental implants). Our environment optimizes patient outcomes and comfort throughout treatment.

Call 828-274-9440 to learn more.

Recent Posts

Categories

Archives