Considering Dental Implants? Why A Specialist Should Be Your Choice.


Posted on Jun 22, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

With added safety precautions and appointment protocols, our Asheville periodontal dental office has resumed a full schedule. And, we are busy!

In spite of the challenges surrounding a global pandemic, people are still in need of treatment for gum disease. Especially now. Gum disease is an inflammatory disease that is an added burden to the immune system. Because our immune systems need to be operating at peak levels to fight infection, healthy gums are being given renewed recognition.

As a periodontist, I also specialize in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. We continue to provide this much needed option to patients in need of replacing teeth. After all, regardless of the challenges people face, they still need to be able to bite, chew, and speak.

When it comes to a partial or bridge to replace teeth, a patient faces future risks. Because a partial or bridge rely on adjacent teeth for support, the natural tooth (teeth) that serve to support these appliances bring on a significant challenge.

These dental prosthetics place added pressure and stress to the supporting natural teeth. Thus, there is a greater potential for damage to the structure of the natural teeth. This places those “crowned” teeth at risk for being the next to be lost.

Americans are coming to know that a denture creates a great many challenges. One of the most common complaints has to do with dentures that begin to move or ‘slip’ when eating or even speaking. This is due to bone loss that is occurring under the denture.

Without stimulation to the jaw bone where tooth roots were once supported, the bone begins to shrink. This is known as resorption. As resorption continues, the denture that was designed to the unique shape and height of this gum-covered ‘arch’ no longer provides a snug fit.

Because of this, denture wearers come to rely on denture adhesives and pastes. However, over time even frequent applications of these products are of little help. Relines, another option, can be done to reshape the denture’s base to conform to the shrinking arch. Eventually, even relines provide minimal improvement.

Bone loss also shows up in facial appearance. As the bone structures that give our face its shape start to shrink, deep wrinkles form around the mouth. Eventually, the corners of the mouth will turn downward, even when smiling. Jowls form on each side of the face as facial muscles detach from the declining bone structure.

As the jaw bone continues to shrink, the chin becomes more pointed and the nose seems to move closer to it. This leads to a collapsed mouth, sometimes referred to as a ‘granny look.’ This look ages the appearance of an individual that is far beyond their actual years.

However, the greatest challenge is when eating becomes a struggle. Because of movement and resulting sore spots on tender gum tissues, foods that require biting and rigorous chewing are often set aside for softer foods that dissolve quickly in the mouth.

Unfortunately, these food choices often offer less-than-ideal nutritional benefits, and typically very little fiber. It’s no wonder that denture wearers tend to have more gastrointestinal problems than people who are able to chew sufficiently and comfortably.

To me, what is especially troubling for long-time denture wearers is the avoidance of social gatherings. Studies have shown that being socially involved helps adults be more active both physically and mentally.

In a February 2019 article, Science Daily shared, “Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being.” (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190220074610.htm)

When adults fear embarrassing slips, clicks, or uncomfortable food pieces that become trapped between the gums and denture, declining social invitations becomes more and more frequent. Since many social gatherings include food or are centered around meals, denture-wearing adults have difficult choices to make. Go and hope for the best or risk an embarrassing moment?

As dental implants have become a more practical and popular option, adults are turning away from dentures, partials, or bridges. In addition to restoring biting and chewing comfort and stability, implants offer a lifetime replacement option that actually enhances the well-being and lifespan of surrounding teeth.

In dental implant treatment, the ‘implanted’ portion is positioned into the jaw bone as a tooth root replacement. This provides the attached teeth the same foundation as natural tooth roots have. This also recreates stimulation to the bone, halting the process of bone loss.

So, why should you search out a periodontist for your dental implant treatment? With so many one-stop clinics and online implant “special price today only!”, is the care of a periodontal specialist really needed?

Below are some reasons to consider how your dental implant treatment begins. Because, in the long run, it is a significant factor in the end result.

• Proper diagnosis: A periodontal specialist has advanced training to properly diagnose and place the most appropriate dental implant system for your needs and goals.
• Appropriate treatment: I have a reputation for never over-treating or under-treating. We structure treatment to provide the most successful outcome based on each patient’s unique needs by the most conservative means possible. Thus, the patient avoid having more time and expense than is necessary.
• Proper tools & equipment: As a periodontal office, we are fully prepared for the diagnosis and treatment of all stages of gum disease as well as the placement of dental implants. As such, we can tend to our patients in an efficient and effective manner. This also enables us to provide treatment in minimal time and to an exceptional level of comfort.
• Advanced features: In addition to trust, one of the reasons we receive so many referrals from physicians, dentists, and past/present patients has to do with the advanced technology and features we provide. We are also known for providing a high level of patient comfort through the administration of IV sedation (twilight sleep) with our on-site Board Certified Anesthesiologist. Additionally, diagnosis and treatment planning is backed by images from our on-site 3D Cone Beam technology.
• A respectful environment: We treat each patient with the same respect, compassion and gentle hands that we would want for ourselves and our loved ones. We take great pride in knowing our patients experience the finest periodontal and implant care available in the Southeastern United States.

Because of their ability to restore the presence of natural teeth to such a great extent, the dental profession now sees dental implants as the preferred choice for replacement for most patients. Although the overall treatment costs may seem greater initially, over time, it becomes obvious that the benefits far outweigh the expense.

When you consider that dental implants are designed to last a lifetime, the investment is a wise one. There are very little things in this day and age that will last as long as we do!

If you are considering dental implants, increase your potential for a successful outcome by asking a Periodontist to join your dentist in team treatment. Most general dentists have close relationships with periodontal specialists for implant placement and in treating gum disease.

Before you make your decision, you may wish to schedule a consultation to discuss your specific needs and desires. We are always happy to welcome new patients and being referred is not required. Call 828-274-9440.

The 1-2-3’s Of Dental Implants


Posted on Apr 29, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Over time, certain things are often referred to in catchphrases that simplify what is being described. For example, “Kleenex” is actually a brand name that refers to tissues. “Clorox” is commonly used as a generic for bleach, even though it’s a specific brand. And, “Uber” has become a way to describe a paid means of auto transportation, even if a taxi or Lyft is being used.

This is why the term “dental implant” may be confusing to some people. This implies the replacement of a missing tooth or teeth with a base that is implanted  into the jaw bone. However, to be clear, a dental implant is not an entire structure. Let’s look at the various components of a complete dental implant system.

Although there are different types of implant systems (designed to accommodate specific needs), all work in in a similar fashion. The actual “implant” is a hollow, screw-like cylinder. This is the portion that is actually “implanted” in the jaw bone at a strategic angle and depth.

Once placed, the implant is covered over with gum tissue. For several months after, the implant goes through a process known as “osseointegration.” In this, the bone grows around the implanted portion, which secure it in place. This restores the foundation like that of natural teeth for dependable and comfortable biting and chewing stability.

This stage, often referred to as the “healing” process, typically takes several months. However, a denture or temporary can be worn comfortably so going without teeth is not a worry.

Once healing is complete, a post is secured inside the hollow core of the implant. This post will support your final replacement tooth or teeth. Most replacement teeth are made of porcelain, which provides the most durable of all materials used in dental restorations.

Porcelain is an ideal material for replacement teeth. It is less resistant to stains and provides an exceptionally natural look and feel, even reflecting light as a natural tooth.

A successful outcome in any Dental Implant treatment begins with the selection and placement process. A Periodontist has specialized training in the diagnosis and placement of all types of implant systems. This means the implant system recommended for you will be the type most suited to your individual needs and goals.

An important aspect of implant success also relies on the assessment of bone mass. When the upper or lower jaw has insufficient bone to support the implant being placed, there is a risk of failure. This can occur in implants placed too close to the sinus cavity (for upper implants) or a nerve that runs through the mandible (lower jaw).

Too, an implant requires careful selection and placement in order to adequately support the replacement teeth being attached. In some cases, as few as 4 – 6 implants can support a complete arch of teeth. This decision is best left in the hands of a periodontal specialist.

In cases of severe bone loss, a periodontist can also perform bone rebuilding procedures prior to implant placement. This is sometimes through bone grafting but most commonly the application of a bone-rebuilding material. Additionally, some implant systems, such as the “All On 4” utilize unique angles to provide support in minimal bone depth with no bone rebuilding necessary.

The best implant system for you can be determined after an examination. During this time, I can discuss options best for you and explain the process. Call 828-274-9440 to schedule an appointment. Or, ask to begin with a Consultation.

We also encourage you to share any concerns about comfort options or treatment fees. Many people avoid looking into dental implant treatment because they are afraid of the procedure or fear they cannot manage the fees. Rather than assume these are obstacles, share your concerns so we can address them head on!

 

Be In-The-Know To Avoid Cavities, Gum Disease


Posted on Apr 02, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

During this highly unusual time, people are relying on the internet for communication (work and social), information, and entertainment. Computers, tablets and smart phones are keeping us connected as we ‘shelter in place’ until this global pandemic is under control.

A lot of Americans are using their “stuck inside” time to expand their minds. Whether it’s to enjoy an audio book, watch PBS specials, or learn how to do something on YouTube, using the time positively is helping people avoid getting mired down in worry and anxiety.

As a periodontal specialist in Asheville, NC, I hope adults will use some of their time to become more aware of the hazards of gum disease. The damage that periodontal disease (‘perio’) can have far reaching consequences, affecting the health inside and mouth and overall health, as I’ll explain.

People are often surprised to hear that they have developed gum disease since it is often without obvious symptoms in early stages. Once it’s fully underway, however, many people ignore the warning signs or assume they’ll “go away”.

In my dental specialty, I believe that by keeping Americans informed of how the progression of gum disease occurs could help to greatly reduce the extent of this disease, which plaques over 47 percent of adults.

Let’s begin by looking at the process of gum disease:

•  Oral Bacteria: The mouth is a warm, dark and moist environment — perfect for harboring bacteria. The mouth is the first point of contact for a large extent of the bacteria that enters the body. Bacteria is on food, utensils, lip gloss and even your tooth brush. All mouths have bacteria, some of it are beneficial. Although bacteria in the mouth are perfectly ‘normal’, the problem begins when too much bacteria accumulate.

•  Plaque: Without proper brushing, flossing, saliva flow and diet, oral bacteria can reproduce rapidly. For an example of just how quickly these bacteria accumulate, run your tongue over your teeth after brushing in the morning. They should feel slick and clean. Then, before brushing at bedtime, run your tongue over your teeth again. The accumulation of oral bacteria over the mere course of a day has likely formed a sticky film on teeth. This is known as plaque. This film is actually a coating of bacteria.

•  Tartar (or Calculus): In just 48 hours, unremoved plaque can harden into tartar. These ‘chunks’ are colonies of oral bacteria and typically attach to the base of teeth near the gum line. These cement-hard masses can no longer be brushed or flossed away. They must be removed by a dentist or hygienist with special tools. If allowed to remain, like plaque, tartar will continue to multiply as these bacterial colonies feed on tooth enamel and tender gum tissues.

•  Gingivitis: This is the first stage of gum disease. At this level, gum tissues are under attack and become sore. They may bleed easily when brushing and you may experience an aching sensation in some areas. Breath odor is stronger, even soon after brushing. At this point, with proper measures, you can restore your gums to a healthy state. However, the window of opportunity to combat gingivitis is brief.

•  Periodontal (Gum) Disease: At this stage, the gums are inflamed and tender. They begin to darken in color and the seal of gum tissues surrounding teeth begins to loosen. The breath is persistently bad. As this stage of gum disease worsens, it can lead to severe health risks elsewhere in the body.

•  Periodontitis: This is the advanced stage of gum disease. The gums are so tender that eating becomes difficult. Breath odor is putrid, as it reflects the rotting state in your mouth. The gum tissues are highly inflamed. Pus pockets may form on the gums near the base of teeth. Eventually, teeth will loosen as the gum tissues and bone structures that support them are destroyed. Tooth removal at this stage is not uncommon.

To no surprise, gum disease is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss. Yet, it’s one of the most preventable diseases with simple measures.

An even more concerning aspect of gum disease is its ability to enter the bloodstream. Once bloodborne, these infectious bacteria can trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. Gum disease bacteria has been linked to heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, stoke, memory loss, preterm babies, impotency, some cancers and even Alzheimer’s disease.

This is why we want you to be aware of the importance of having a healthy mouth. We realize there are financial obstacles for some people. However, most dental and specialty offices offer payment plans, many are interest free with no down payment required.

Some people avoid dental visits because they have anxiety or fears. Dental fear is fairly common, even in America where dental care is so advanced (in most practices). If deep fear or anxiety has prevented you from regular dental visits or having much-need treatment, finding a dentist who is experienced in caring for fearful patients is easier today.

Using advanced technology, such as laser dentistry, cone beam imaging, and other features, we are able to diagnose problems more precisely, which helps to minimize treatment. Many options enhance patient comfort and speed healing time.

For many fearful patients, we also offer oral or IV sedation (“twilight sleep”). We are fully equipped for the safety and comfort of administering sedatives for our patients for treatment in our office. Here, patients know us for our gentle touch and respectful, attentive care for each individual.

Occasionally, I hear a patient relay their impression of tooth loss being “just part of growing older.” That is far from the truth. The human body does ‘break down’ here and there but keeping your teeth for a lifetime is a reasonable expectation with proper measures.

Having healthy gums that support teeth can be achieved with an involved relationship with a dentist and a committed oral hygiene routine at home. With proper care, you can easily enjoy a smile of natural teeth all your life.

Twice daily brushing (at least two minutes per time), daily flossing, drinking ample water and limiting sweets and caffeine are simple ways to keep your mouth healthy between regular dental check-ups and cleanings. And, those 6-month check-ups are important. At this time, any tartar that has accumulated can be removed and signs of early gum disease can be noted.

Losing teeth due to gum disease leads to expensive and lifelong upkeep with crown-&-bridge, partials, full denture or dental implants. These tooth replacement needs can be avoided.

If you are experiencing symptoms of gum disease, call 828-274-9440. If fear is an obstacle to having a healthy, confident smile, begin with a consultation to discuss your needs.

 

Are Dentures Or Partials Causing Your Face To ‘Melt’?


Posted on Feb 12, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Occasionally, I’ll unexpectedly walk by a mirror and notice an old man looking at me, only to realize “that’s ME!”

As we age, hopefully most people don’t “feel” their actual age, although the person in the mirror isn’t quite the image we want to have. Most of us “see” ourselves as looking ten or so years younger (and probably 10 or so pounds lighter!).

Aging gracefully is a positive part of our lives. At any age, as long as we look and feel like we’ve taken pretty good care of ourselves, each birthday should cause more smiles than not. However, for people who are long-time denture or partial wearers, the signs and challenges of aging are more obvious.

Wearing a full denture or a partial denture appears, visually, to replace missing teeth. While the gum based that supports these replacement teeth “plumps up” the face when they are in place, this fullness can be deceiving.

What is really taking place – that you can’t see – is the loss of bone mass, or resorption.

Resorption describes a melting away of bone. For the upper or lower jaw, the areas where natural tooth roots no longer exist experience this almost immediately after they are removed.

Resorption occurs when tooth roots are no longer providing stimulation and nourishment to the bones that support them. This causes the bone “ridge” that holds the denture or partial to flatten out.

Bone loss begins almost immediately after teeth are removed. The pressure on the ridge while wearing dentures or partials actually accelerates the rate of bone loss. For people who sleep in their dentures, this increases the process even more.

In addition to appearance changes, bone loss is the reason that dentures slip or rub. This is because the denture was conformed to the ridge when it was first made. As the ridge flattens, the denture no longer ‘hugs’ the surface it was designed for.

As resorption continues, changes in facial appearance are occurring as wel. The best way to detect bone loss is to remove your ‘appliance’ and look in the mirror. However, even with the denture in place, certain facial changes may be obvious.

Jowls form on the sides of face as facial muscles detach from the declining bone mass. Deep wrinkles form around the lips and the corners of the mouth turn down, even in a smile.

As resorption worsens, the mouth seems to collapse into the face. The chin becomes more pointed and the nose and chin move closer together. This appearance is referred to as a “granny look,” aging one’s appearance far beyond their actual years.

How do you avoid a ‘melting face’?

One of the many advantages of dental implants is their ability to halt bone loss. The implanted portion restores stimulation to the jaw bone and provides a natural biting and chewing stability.

As a periodontist, an area of this advanced dental specialty is the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Because there are many different types of implant systems, having a specialist select and place the one best for you will enhance your overall outcome.

In our Asheville periodontal office, we also offer oral and IV sedation (twilight sleep). These are administered by a board certified Anesthesiologist. This is a medical doctor (MD) who ensures safety and comfort are priorities throughout your procedure.

With dental implants, you can improve your appearance and health. Learn more about the lifelong benefits of dental implants by visiting our web site or calling 828-274-9440.

 

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