Know The Qualifications of Who Places Your Dental Implants.


Posted on Apr 05, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

When someone has lost a natural tooth, the word that stands out for me is “lost”. A missing tooth means a lot can be lost.

Tooth loss not only leaves a gap in the appearance of a smile, its absence can lead to movement of surrounding teeth.

For example, some people assume that a lost back tooth that is not visible doesn’t need replacing. This is an incorrect assumption. Without all teeth in their proper positions, a gap can cause others to tilt and turn. Additionally, the one above or below will grow longer. These misalignment issues can lead to broken, fractured, or chipped teeth.

Misaligned teeth can also lead to strain on the TMJ, or jaw joints. These joints, located on each side of the head just in front of the ears, are hinges that connect the lower jaw bone to the skull. They are in motion almost constantly.

When the jaw joints experience frequent strain from misaligned teeth, they can cause pain that extends out to head, neck and shoulder muscles. TMJ-related pain can be the source for headaches, migraines, facial pain, ear ringing, dizziness, pain when chewing and difficulty opening the mouth fully.

Obviously, replacing teeth is important. Because of many factors, a dental implant is the superior choice in tooth replacement. A dental implant is a lifetime replacement option. Dental implants restore the ability to bite, chew, speak and laugh confidently without worry. The security of their strength and stability can also be greatly beneficial to one’s self-esteem and self-confidence.

Too, dental implants actually enhance the well-being and lifespan of surrounding teeth. They are an exceptional value when considering their ability to restore the most natural look, feel and function.

In dental implant treatment, the implanted portion is positioned in the jaw bone as a tooth root replacement. This provides attached teeth with the same foundation as natural tooth roots. A partial or bridge simply sits on top of gum tissues and relies on adjacent teeth for support.

Yet, it can be in WHO is involved in your dental implant diagnosis and placement that can provide you with optimal comfort and lifelong success.

When dental offices offer dental implants, many general dentists refer the placement portion to a periodontal specialist. For their patient, this can mean a higher level of comfort and success, especially for complex needs.

However, some dentists offer dental implant placement in their offices. While some have taken extensive courses in implant dentistry, others may have taken a weekend course here and there. These quick courses are typically hosted by an implant manufacturer who trains attendees with a limited selection of implant types. This can limit the patient’s choices when relying on appropriate recommendations for his or her unique needs.

Although there are many factors to go forward with a dental implant, your choice of doctor to place the implanted portion can greatly increase your potential to enjoy your dental implant for a lifetime.

As a periodontist, an aspect of the specialty is the advanced training in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. This specialized expertise affords patients with a wider variety of choices when it comes to implant systems as well as success in treatment outcome.

For example, consider a patient who is missing a lot of bone mass (often due to missing natural teeth for many years). An implant placed in the upper jaw in too-shallow bone can work its way into the sinus cavity. A lower implant in insufficient bone depth can reach a nerve that runs horizontally through the lower jaw (the mandible).

Additionally, the shape, size and the number of teeth to be attached to an implant have much to do with the type of implant system selected. When the placement doctor is only familiar with one or two types, the limitation may pose problems for the patient in the future.

Along with an intricate knowledge of the specific type of implant needed, proper placement angles and depth have much to do with the overall success of the implant. For optimal results, the doctor placing the implant should be skilled in the selection of the implant angles and positioning depths.

In our Asheville periodontal office, we restore the well-being of smiles. We also help patients replace bothersome dentures or partials so they can resume eating the foods they love and laugh confidently in social gatherings.

The doctor is not the sole factor in success, however, Along with proper selection and placement, a patient must take measures to ensure proper oral hygiene at home. Oral bacteria can contribute to an infection that works its way into the bone surrounding the implant. In some cases, the only way to resolve the infection is to remove the implant.

The most troubling thing I see in implant dentistry is when a patient opted for a “good deal” with a less-experienced doctor, and having to remove a ‘failed’ implant.

When a patient entrusts their implant treatment to a skilled doctor and adheres to hygiene and healing guidelines, having an implant fail is very unlikely. The success rate of today’s implant dentistry is excellent – over 97 percent.

Today’s implant dentistry is successful, safe, dependable and can provide nearly immediate benefits. As a dental specialist who has stayed on the cutting edge of implant dentistry’s techniques, technology and materials, I am pleased to witness the transformations our patients undergo after treatment.

The type of dental implant best suited for you can be determined after an examination and review of x-rays (we use Cone-Beam digital imaging). Call 828-274-9440 to begin with a private, no obligation consultation to discuss your best options.

Missing Teeth? Know The Ends-&-Outs of Dental Implants


Posted on Jan 29, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

If you are one of the millions of adults who are missing one or more natural teeth, you are actually in the majority if you are over the age of 50.

According to the Centers of Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), by the age of 50, Americans have lost an average of 12 teeth. For those between the ages of 50 to 64, over 10 percent have no remaining natural teeth. Twenty-six percent – more than one-fourth – of adults between 65 – 74, have lost ALL of their natural teeth.

Replacing natural teeth may seem simple. Often, people assume that a partial or bridge will solve the problem. Yet, these dental appliances merely worsen an already precarious situation. While these dental prosthetics “mimic” the appearance of teeth, what’s occurring beneath the gum line has a significant impact on what’s to come.

To understand the rocky road in the future, consider the foundation of natural teeth – the jaw bone.

The reason biting and chewing occurs dependably and with stability with natural teeth is because they are secured by the jaw bone. When natural teeth are removed, their roots are no longer present in the jaw bone. The presence of these roots actually provides stimulation to the jaw bone, which helps to preserve the bone’s mass. Without this stimulation, the bone resorbs, a process of which bone mass “melts away”.

Resorption is to blame for dentures or partials that start to move or slip over time, even though the fit was snug when first made. Because resorption reduces bone height, the ridge the denture was contoured to fit begins to flatten. A shrinking ridge leaves the denture with an insufficient base.

The pace of bone loss speeds up a little more each year. The pressure of a denture on the ridge accelerates the rate. For people who sleep in their dentures or partials, the continual pressure ramps up the pace further.

As the ridge flattens, denture adhesives or pastes become of little help while trying to eat. This leads many denture wearers to switch to a diet of soft foods that dissolve easily in the mouth. Often, the pleasure of eating is overshadowed by trying to avoid sore spots on tender gum tissues or embarrassing slips.

Declining bone mass also leads to changes in facial appearance, contributing to an appearance that is far older than one’s actual age. As bone mass declines, jowls form as facial muscles detach from a shrinking bone mass. Deep wrinkles form around the mouth and the corners of the mouth turn downward, even in a smile. As bone loss becomes severe, the chin points and the nose moves closer to the chin, creating a ‘granny look.’

As an Asheville periodontist, my dental specialty includes the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Dental implants are the closest thing to natural teeth, for many reasons.

Dental implants restore the ability to bite and chew comfortably and without the fear of embarrassment or uncomfortable rubbing. Because implants are placed in the jaw bone, they have the same dependable foundation as that of natural teeth.

Among the many benefits of dental implants, they also provide stimulation to the jaw bone. This helps to halt the process of bone loss. For those who have already lost a great deal of bone loss, bone rebuilding procedures can be performed to restore a healthy, more youthful face shape.

An added advantage of implants is they do not rely on the crowning of otherwise healthy, neighboring teeth for the mere purpose of supporting a bridge. While a traditional crown-&-bridge combination relies on crowned teeth for support, an implant uses the sturdy foundation of your jaw bone.

There are over 40 different types of dental implant systems, each designed to accommodate specific needs and goals. For example, some implants are designed for placement in minimal bone mass. Others can be strategically placed to support a bridge of two or more teeth or support a full arch.

When choosing Dental Implants to replace teeth, you are making a lifelong investment. Since implants are designed to last a lifetime, they provide a ‘one & done’ choice for dependable tooth replacement. There are not many things these days that give you so much value!

If you struggle with dental fear or anxiety, rest assured that patient comfort – at every appointment – is of the highest priority. Our office is structured to attend to the specific needs of each patient, gently and respectfully. Patients begin with a consultation in a comfortable, private setting rather than seated in a treatment chair.

For patients who desire a “sleep” state, we offer oral sedation as well as I.V. sedation (twilight sleep). Oral sedation is a pill that helps patients relax. It also has an amnesiac effect, leaving most with little or no memory of treatment afterward.

I.V. sedation places the patient in a deeper sedative state (twilight sleep), also erasing memory of the procedure. It is administered by a doctor of anesthesiology for optimal comfort and safety.

With both, patients are closely monitored with advanced safety equipment throughout treatment. Patients also find our entire staff to be a unified team, each bringing a sincere level of compassion and commitment to excellent care.

Rather than bypass the very best option for replacing lost teeth, consider a consultation to discuss the benefits, anticipated costs, and treatment process. Call 828-274-9440 for an appointment in our Asheville periodontal dental office.

Tooth Loss Cause of Shrinking Face, Sunken-In Mouth


Posted on Jan 14, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

The aging process is not an easy one. Joints begin to creak, muscles are more easily strained, skin dries out, eyesight wanes and hearing declines.

Yet, throughout the aging process, some adults seem to go through it as less of an ordeal than others. Although diseases and certain health conditions can occur regardless of how well some people manage, some people take a number of steps that can have a significant impact on aging well and “getting old.”

The basics of good health include a diet low in sugar, alcohol and unhealthy fats. NOT smoking is a big factor in maintaining a healthy body. Regular exercise, sufficient sleep and regular physicals and dental check-ups are all beneficial.

A factor that plays a bigger role in having good overall health is having natural teeth. Having the ability to comfortably bite and chew food is important to effective digestion, since the digestive process begins in the mouth. When adults struggle to eat with a denture or partial, the efficiency of this initial stage of digestion is compromised.

It’s not unusual for adults who have “rocky” or “slippery” dentures to opt for soft foods that dissolve easily in the mouth. These are often carb heavy and lack the nutritional value of a diet that combines healthy proteins, fruits and vegetables. However, missing teeth or dentures that move when eating can cause other detrimental problems.

When people sense their dentures may cause embarrassment when eating, speaking or laughing with others, social involvement can take a hit. According to a 2012 statement by the World Health Organization:

Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. It is a state of being free from mouth and facial pain, oral and throat cancer, oral infection and sores, periodontal (gum) disease, tooth decay, tooth loss, and other diseases and disorders that limit an individual’s capacity in biting, chewing, smiling, speaking, and psycho-social well-being.

An extensive study on “The Link Between Teeth and Emotions” was published by Clinical Psychology of Oral Health (https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2158244017728319) in 2017.

In the study, the concept of quality of life was categorized in five dimensions: physical well-being, material well-being, social well-being, emotional well-being, and development and activity”.

The authors found that oral health is “an integral part of general health and well-being” and examined how oral disorders may impair at least three of the five dimensions: the physical, emotional, and social well-being.

The authors found also an association between oral health and late life depression (LLD) in older adults, who experienced “compromised social function and impaired self-maintenance skills (e.g., bathing, dressing, hygiene).” This depression can cause a loss of pleasure and interest for daily life activities, and even in the interest in personal oral hygiene.

Oral health not only has an impact on the psychological well-being of older adults, the physical changes attributed to tooth loss are of equal concern to many denture wearers.

Let’s look at your oral anatomy for a moment…

Your natural teeth are supported by your upper and lower jaw bone, known respectfully as the Maxilla and Mandible. With these strong, study bones, tooth roots are held securely. Thus, biting and chewing occurs comfortably.

The jaw bones are actually kept healthy by the presence of tooth roots. These roots provide stimulation to the bone as well as nourishment that feeds through the tooth’s interior.

When a tooth is removed, so is the stimulation and nourishment to that area of the jaw bone. Without it, the bone begins to shrink. As it declines in height, the adjacent teeth are more vulnerable to loss. Statistics show that teeth adjacent to areas where natural teeth are missing will be the most likely to be lost next.

This has a domino effect. Partials can replace the presence of teeth above the gum line, but there is nothing to benefit the jaw bones below. Thus, tooth loss continues and can go from a few missing teeth to losing all teeth (being “edentulous”).

According to the Center for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), 69 percent of adults between the ages of 35 – 44 have lost at least one permanent tooth. By age 50, Americans are missing an average of 12 teeth. For adults between the ages of 65 – 74, 26 percent are missing all of their natural teeth. That’s over one-fourth of the adult population over age 65.

Although dentures and partials mimic the presence of teeth, the jaw bones below are shrinking away, and at a rather rapid pace. The pressure of wearing a denture or partial actually speeds this process up, known as “resorption.”

As these bones decline in mass, deep wrinkles form around the mouth. The corners of the mouth turn downward. The chin takes on a more pointed form and the mouth sinks into the face. The nose seems to get closer to the chin as the jaw bones thin. Jowls form as facial muscles detach from shrinking bone structure.

Dental implants were designed to recreate the presence of natural teeth both above and below the gum line. Because teeth attached to the implants are supported by the jaw bones, the study foundation restores the ability to bite and chew without movement or fear of embarrassing slips.

For patients who are missing a great deal of bone, we offer bone rebuilding that does not require a bone graft. We also perform sinus lifts (when the upper jaw has declined to a significant level) to restore sufficient bone distance between vital structures.

For many of our dental implant patients, their lives become more active with the restored confidence. They become more socially involved, have more self-confidence and higher self-esteem.

Although dentures and partials may seem to be a less-expensive way to replace teeth, the savings is hardly worth the detrimental repercussions associated with them. Too, the upkeep required for dentures over time is actually high, considering replacement, relines and repairs.

As a periodontal specialist serving Western NC, I take great pride in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Each is selected based upon the patient’s individual needs and goals. We provide oral or I.V. sedation to ensure a comfortable experience and a friendly, respectful environment.

Begin with a friendly conversation in our private consultation room. In this comfortable setting, we’ll discuss your options and I’ll answer your questions. For many people, they are able to make a decision on how they wish to proceed after this conversation, even if it’s to go forward with dentures. We are supportive of each person’s preferences.

Call 828-274-9440 to schedule a consultation in our state-of-the-art Asheville periodontal dental office. I think you’ll feel especially confident in learning about our specialized skills and highly-advanced technology, not available in many dental offices in this area.

 

 

 

 

Understanding Dental Implants & Their Benefits


Posted on Nov 03, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

When you lose a natural tooth, even one that isn’t visible when you smile, its absence causes a reaction that takes place below the gum line. Many people are unaware of what occurs – at first. When it becomes obvious, it leads to problems that are not only bothersome, they are detrimental to your overall health.

The absence of a tooth root in the upper or lower jaw bone is a loss of stimulation the bone mass where it was once positioned. These roots provide stimulation and nourishment that enables the bone to maintain a healthy mass. Without the presence of tooth roots, the bone begins to “melt away.” The term for this process is known as resorption.

Resorption begins shortly after the tooth root is removed. Once it begins, it continues at an ever-increasing pace. For example, the first year after a tooth root is missing, the loss of bone may be minimal. With each passing year, the rate of loss accelerates.

As the bone shrinks in height, the natural tooth roots adjacent to the area of missing teeth are vulnerable to movement and root damage. On average, the teeth most likely to be lost are the ones next to areas of tooth loss.

For the support of remaining natural teeth, it’s important to replace missing teeth as soon as possible so adjacent teeth can retain their proper positions. It is even more important to replace missing teeth before bone loss begins. And, it’s HOW you replace them that’s most important.

Because dental implants replace the tooth above the gum line AND the root portion below it, the bone is able to retain its mass. Dental implants are designed to restore the look, feel and chewing stability like that of natural teeth.

As the advantages of dental implants become more familiar for natural tooth replacement, there are still some misconceptions among the general population. The following will hopefully clear up some of the confusion.

First, Dental Implants are a term that describes 3 components. The “implanted” portion is placed in your jaw bone where a tooth root was once held. The “implant” is not what holds the tooth. It serves to anchor an attached tooth (or bridge of two or more teeth).

Made from titanium, this metal bonds to living bone successfully. As a matter of fact, dental implants have one of the highest success rates of any implant-in-bone procedures.

The implanted portion becomes anchored in the jaw bone through a process known as ‘osseo-integration.’ Once the implant has been secured by the bone, a post is inserted into the center of the implant. This post is known as an abutment.

The replacement tooth (or teeth) is usually made of porcelain. This is the portion that you see and looks just like a natural tooth. This is known as a restoration or crown. It is attached securely to this post.

Porcelain is commonly used to create the restorations because they provide the most durable material possible and have the look and feel of a natural tooth. Porcelain has a luminosity of natural teeth and even reflects light as a natural tooth would. Porcelain is also very resistant to staining.

When missing more than one tooth in one area, an implant is not always necessary to replace each one. As mentioned prior, one implant can often hold two or a bridge of teeth. Several strategically-placed implants may also be used support a full arch of teeth.

When people can chew properly and eat a healthy diet, their overall health is better. And, without the fear of embarrassing slips or clicks (often associated with denture wear), being socially active can continue to be a positive part of a happy life.

Dental implants restore the ability to eat with stability, chew comfortably, laugh and speak with confidence. Dental implants do not decay and will never need root canals. And, with proper care, they’ll last your lifetime.

There are many types of implants, each designed to accommodate specific needs. Many dental implants are chosen and placed by a Periodontist. This is a dental specialist who has extensive and specialized training in the diagnosis and placement of all types of dental implants. He or she can select the one that will work best for you.

Proper placement and support in caring for implants is an important part of a successful outcome. Dental Implants CAN fail. This is why a periodontal specialist can be an asset to your investment.

If infection sets in and reaches the implanted portion, the implant may need to be removed so treatment can resolve the problem. Your periodontist can assess gum health prior to placement and monitor your healing process to help minimize this risk.

There are other threats to dental implant success. Clenching or grinding teeth can also contribute to implant failure. Smoking complicates and delays the healing process and is also a known contributor to implant failure. Again, a periodontist can oversee your care to optimize your ability to enjoy a lifetime of confident smiles.

Call 828-274-9440 to arrange a consultation. During this time, we can discuss treatment that can achieve your needs and goals as well as the process and anticipated costs. If dental fear is a concern, I’ll also explain sedation options. We offer both oral sedation and IV sedation, if a “twilight sleep” state is preferred. Here, you’ll find your comfort is always a priority.

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