Advanced Skills & Technology Enhance Comfort, Speed Healing


Posted on Apr 27, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

If you’ve ever watched a cabinet maker, his skill and attention to detail is impressive. He knows the various wood types, understands the details of joints and angles, and respects the individual components as interacting pieces that will work harmoniously as a whole.

Because he has the tools and skills specific to his craft, the coming-together of this typically provides a ‘forever’ result.

In the periodontal specialty, our specific skills create a number of advantages for patients who have different needs. Some of these skills are not always obvious, yet they allow for a higher level of success, greater comfort, and less time required for healing.

A periodontist, as defined by the American Academy of Periodontology (perio.org), is:

“A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal disease, and in the placement of dental implants. Periodontists are also experts in the treatment of oral inflammation. Periodontists receive extensive training in these areas, including three additional years of education beyond dental school. They are familiar with the latest techniques for diagnosing and treating periodontal disease, and are also trained in performing cosmetic periodontal procedures.”

As an Asheville periodontal specialist for over 25 years, I’ve utilized my advanced skills to help patients with a variety of needs that involve the gum tissues. These include:

– Treatment of all stages of gum disease (gingivitis, pregnancy gingivitis, periodontal disease, periodontitis)

– Reshaping gum tissues for esthetic enhancement (crown lengthening, gingivectomy for ‘gummy smiles’, repairing areas of gum recession)

– Diagnosis and placement of dental implants

– Treatment of lesions or cysts in oral tissues

Although there are other treatments offered, our main goal is to provide the patient with a comfortable and positive experience within our specialized skills. We believe that patients will come to appreciate the advantages of having a healthy smile and understand how our involvement can create a healthier, more confident individual.

Here, our Western North Carolina periodontal dental office features some of the most advanced technology in dentistry. Many of these are not available in other dental offices elsewhere. Some of these features include:

LANAP With PerioLase MVP 7 – Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure is an advanced protocol that efficiently and effectively treats advanced gum disease with the added advantages of a dental laser. This offers a non-surgical alternative for patients with moderate to severe periodontal disease. LANAP treatment leaves very little discomfort and has a quick recovery time. It has also been found to stimulate bone regrowth in damaged areas.

3-D Cone Beam Imaging
 – Ideal for diagnoses and treatment planning, these images provide a clear view of the upper and lower jaw, used for: intricate review of endodontics; periodontics; orthodontics; implantology: TMJ; and prosthodontics, as well as dental and maxillofacial surgery. Because cone beam radiographs show sagittal, axial, and coronal planes, locating and tracking nerve canals optimizes implant placement. The process is quick, painless and at minimal levels of radiation.

CareStream Cone Beam Computer Tomography Imaging
 – This enhanced tomography works with 3D imaging for exceptional detail and range.

CS 3600 Intraoral Scanner
 – Rather than make impressions with bulky, goopy trays, this scanner quickly and comfortably captures digital impressions accurately and easily for creating precision models or appliances (crowns, inlays, onlays, bridges, orthodontic appliances and aligners, custom abutments). The scanner can also reach difficult–to–access areas in the patient’s mouth for superior results with improved patient comfort.

Computerized Dental Implant Placement
 – This advanced system for pre-surgical positioning of dental implants uses a 3D model of the patient’s jaw. Once the implant type is selected, a template is developed for optimal treatment success, even for complex cases.

In addition, we offer a unique environment for comfort. We understand how dental fear or anxiety can cause people to delay or avoid having dental treatment, sometimes for decades. Too, when regular dental cleanings and check-ups are not maintained, the results often culminate into more complex problems (and necessary repairs) in the future.

We help patients understand that these fears and concerns are not unusual. Our doctors and staff respect each patient and provide gentle, compassionate care – at every appointment.

For those who have high fear levels, we offer several sedation options, including oral and IV sedation. Oral sedation is a pill that helps patients relax. It also has an amnesiac effect, leaving most with little or no memory of treatment afterward.

I.V. sedation (also known as ‘twilight sleep’) places the patient in a deeper sleep state and erases memory of the procedure. It is administered by a doctor of anesthesiology for optimal comfort and safety. In our Asheville office, anesthesia is overseen by a Medical Doctor (MD) who is a board certified Anesthesiologist.

With both sedation options, patients are closely monitored with advanced safety equipment throughout treatment.

How I would describe the difference between a periodontist and other dental specialists is in how gentle and respectful we are to the tissues in the mouth. These are tender layers that significantly affect the appearance of a smile and the health of teeth. By understanding the techniques to minimize incisions while effectively treating each area in the mouth, a periodontist is your expert.

We feel you’ll find no better periodontal dental environment. Call 828-274-9440 to learn more or to schedule a consultation appointment. New patients are always welcome and a referral is not required.

 

Know The Qualifications of Who Places Your Dental Implants.


Posted on Apr 05, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

When someone has lost a natural tooth, the word that stands out for me is “lost”. A missing tooth means a lot can be lost.

Tooth loss not only leaves a gap in the appearance of a smile, its absence can lead to movement of surrounding teeth.

For example, some people assume that a lost back tooth that is not visible doesn’t need replacing. This is an incorrect assumption. Without all teeth in their proper positions, a gap can cause others to tilt and turn. Additionally, the one above or below will grow longer. These misalignment issues can lead to broken, fractured, or chipped teeth.

Misaligned teeth can also lead to strain on the TMJ, or jaw joints. These joints, located on each side of the head just in front of the ears, are hinges that connect the lower jaw bone to the skull. They are in motion almost constantly.

When the jaw joints experience frequent strain from misaligned teeth, they can cause pain that extends out to head, neck and shoulder muscles. TMJ-related pain can be the source for headaches, migraines, facial pain, ear ringing, dizziness, pain when chewing and difficulty opening the mouth fully.

Obviously, replacing teeth is important. Because of many factors, a dental implant is the superior choice in tooth replacement. A dental implant is a lifetime replacement option. Dental implants restore the ability to bite, chew, speak and laugh confidently without worry. The security of their strength and stability can also be greatly beneficial to one’s self-esteem and self-confidence.

Too, dental implants actually enhance the well-being and lifespan of surrounding teeth. They are an exceptional value when considering their ability to restore the most natural look, feel and function.

In dental implant treatment, the implanted portion is positioned in the jaw bone as a tooth root replacement. This provides attached teeth with the same foundation as natural tooth roots. A partial or bridge simply sits on top of gum tissues and relies on adjacent teeth for support.

Yet, it can be in WHO is involved in your dental implant diagnosis and placement that can provide you with optimal comfort and lifelong success.

When dental offices offer dental implants, many general dentists refer the placement portion to a periodontal specialist. For their patient, this can mean a higher level of comfort and success, especially for complex needs.

However, some dentists offer dental implant placement in their offices. While some have taken extensive courses in implant dentistry, others may have taken a weekend course here and there. These quick courses are typically hosted by an implant manufacturer who trains attendees with a limited selection of implant types. This can limit the patient’s choices when relying on appropriate recommendations for his or her unique needs.

Although there are many factors to go forward with a dental implant, your choice of doctor to place the implanted portion can greatly increase your potential to enjoy your dental implant for a lifetime.

As a periodontist, an aspect of the specialty is the advanced training in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. This specialized expertise affords patients with a wider variety of choices when it comes to implant systems as well as success in treatment outcome.

For example, consider a patient who is missing a lot of bone mass (often due to missing natural teeth for many years). An implant placed in the upper jaw in too-shallow bone can work its way into the sinus cavity. A lower implant in insufficient bone depth can reach a nerve that runs horizontally through the lower jaw (the mandible).

Additionally, the shape, size and the number of teeth to be attached to an implant have much to do with the type of implant system selected. When the placement doctor is only familiar with one or two types, the limitation may pose problems for the patient in the future.

Along with an intricate knowledge of the specific type of implant needed, proper placement angles and depth have much to do with the overall success of the implant. For optimal results, the doctor placing the implant should be skilled in the selection of the implant angles and positioning depths.

In our Asheville periodontal office, we restore the well-being of smiles. We also help patients replace bothersome dentures or partials so they can resume eating the foods they love and laugh confidently in social gatherings.

The doctor is not the sole factor in success, however, Along with proper selection and placement, a patient must take measures to ensure proper oral hygiene at home. Oral bacteria can contribute to an infection that works its way into the bone surrounding the implant. In some cases, the only way to resolve the infection is to remove the implant.

The most troubling thing I see in implant dentistry is when a patient opted for a “good deal” with a less-experienced doctor, and having to remove a ‘failed’ implant.

When a patient entrusts their implant treatment to a skilled doctor and adheres to hygiene and healing guidelines, having an implant fail is very unlikely. The success rate of today’s implant dentistry is excellent – over 97 percent.

Today’s implant dentistry is successful, safe, dependable and can provide nearly immediate benefits. As a dental specialist who has stayed on the cutting edge of implant dentistry’s techniques, technology and materials, I am pleased to witness the transformations our patients undergo after treatment.

The type of dental implant best suited for you can be determined after an examination and review of x-rays (we use Cone-Beam digital imaging). Call 828-274-9440 to begin with a private, no obligation consultation to discuss your best options.

Bad Breath – The “Body Odor” of the Mouth.


Posted on Mar 09, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

“Whoa!!!”

That may be our unspoken reaction when we encounter someone who’s breath odor reeks. And, we’ve all encountered it. It tends to leave a rather negative impression of the individual; one that ‘sticks’ with us every time we see him or her in the future.

Occasionally, I like to address the causes of bad breath since, at one time or another, it’s an issue for us all. Bad breath, like body odor, leaves an undesirable imprint.

Although some health conditions can be the source of bad breath, it most commonly occurs due to an overload of oral bacteria. Too many bacteria in the mouth create an odor — a sulfuric, putrid odor.

Bacteria are living organisms that eat, reproduce and emit waste. Their ability to reproduce is astounding, resulting in a consistently growing number of waste-producing creatures.

Poor oral hygiene is the most common cause for bad breath. Not brushing and flossing or doing so adequately allows oral bacteria to reproduce, which leads to plaque.

Plaque is the sticky film you feel on teeth when you’ve missed brushing or when you wake up. When not removed thoroughly on a daily basis, plaque turns into a cement-hard substance known as tartar. This mass is actually a solid colony of oral bacteria that attaches to teeth. In this form, it cannot be brushed or flossed away.

Tartar attacks enamel and gum tissues. As bacteria multiplies, it causes the gum tissues to become inflamed. This inflammation can quickly develop into gingivitis, an early form of gum disease. If not resolved fully, however, gingivitis can lead to full-blown periodontal (gum) disease.

Occasional bad breath is a nuisance but can generally be controlled with good oral hygiene, keeping our mouth moist and limiting sugar. Things like drinking sugary colas and a diet of high carbohydrate foods rev up bacteria reproduction even more, boosting their ability to grow and thrive.

However, frequent bad breath is not only embarrassing, it is a warning sign.

As one of the symptoms of periodontal (gum) disease, persistent bad breath may be accompanied by tender gums that bleed easily when brushing or tender, swollen areas around some teeth.

As gum disease advances, symptoms include gums that turn red in color and become sore, swollen and bleed easily when brushing. As it worsens, bad breath becomes persistent. Pus-filled pockets may develop near the base of some teeth. Eventually, teeth may loosen and require removal.

While what we consume can greatly contribute to the ability of these icky organisms’ ability to reproduce, a common one is having a dry mouth. This condition is known as xerostomia (zeer-o-STOE-me-uh).

Good saliva flow helps to keep bacteria moving out of the mouth. However, when brushing is infrequent or the mouth becomes dry, saliva is less able to manage the bacteria levels in the mouth.

A dry mouth may seem less likely to be a breeding ground for bacteria since they typically thrive in environments that are warm, moist, and dark. However, when saliva flow is unable to efficiently cleanse bacteria buildup from the mouth, they are easily able to reproduce.

Having ‘dry mouth’ is rather common today. In addition to a part of the aging process, a number of common medications (including anti-depressants, decongestants, and anti-histamines) have a side effect of oral dryness.

Too, many beverages contribute to having a dry mouth. These include colas, coffee, tea, and those containing alcohol. (Please note that colas are acidic and most contain caffeine. These are anything but ‘refreshing’, doing very little to hydrate the body. Stick to plain water to quench your thirst and add moisture to the body.)

Another way that oral bacteria can run rampant has to do with our oral hygiene routines. To be truly thorough in cleaning tooth surfaces, it is recommended to spend two minutes per brushing, twice a day (whether manual or electronic).

It is estimated that nearly a third of American adults brush their teeth for an insufficient amount of time. Even worse, about that same amount fail to brush twice a day. This means that an alarming amount of bacteria remain to grow and thrive in the mouth.

Proper brushing and flossing is necessary. Brush for at least two minutes twice daily and swish thoroughly. Use a circular motion rather than scrub teeth back and forth to avoid damaging tender gum tissues. Never use a hard bristle tooth brush or brush with harsh substances such as baking soda! These can wear down tooth enamel and wear away precious gum tissue.

You may be surprised to learn that brushing only tackles about half the amount of bacteria in the mouth, leaving a tremendous amount that continue to grow and thrive. The tongue actually harbors 58 – 65 percent of the bacteria in the ‘oral cavity’.

Oral bacteria love to take up housing in the tiny bumps and grooves of the tongue since they are not easily dislodged. Thus, it’s necessary that tongue cleaning be a part of your oral hygiene regimen at home to keep bacteria levels under control.

Some toothbrushes have a “tongue scraper” on the reverse side of the bristles that’s an effective option. Or, you can brush your tongue with the bristles after your teeth are brushed. Be sure to reach towards the back of the tongue where the majority of bacteria exist.

An advantage of achieving and maintaining a clean, healthy mouth is being confident when close to others. Plus, you’ll be contributing to the health and well-being of your entire body. Research has shown that a healthy mouth is a supportive component of a healthy you!

If you are experiencing symptoms of gum disease or concerned your breath is frequently bad, call 828-274-9440. We’ll arrange a periodontal exam in our comfortable Asheville periodontal office.

Here, we are committed to the comfort of each patient as well as those who have avoided dental care in the past due to fear. Dental fear is common, and we have a reputation for a gentle touch and respectful care. We also make oral and IV sedation (twilight sleep) available.

Let’s help you establish a healthy smile and feel confident in closeness!

Missing Teeth? Know The Ends-&-Outs of Dental Implants


Posted on Jan 29, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

If you are one of the millions of adults who are missing one or more natural teeth, you are actually in the majority if you are over the age of 50.

According to the Centers of Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), by the age of 50, Americans have lost an average of 12 teeth. For those between the ages of 50 to 64, over 10 percent have no remaining natural teeth. Twenty-six percent – more than one-fourth – of adults between 65 – 74, have lost ALL of their natural teeth.

Replacing natural teeth may seem simple. Often, people assume that a partial or bridge will solve the problem. Yet, these dental appliances merely worsen an already precarious situation. While these dental prosthetics “mimic” the appearance of teeth, what’s occurring beneath the gum line has a significant impact on what’s to come.

To understand the rocky road in the future, consider the foundation of natural teeth – the jaw bone.

The reason biting and chewing occurs dependably and with stability with natural teeth is because they are secured by the jaw bone. When natural teeth are removed, their roots are no longer present in the jaw bone. The presence of these roots actually provides stimulation to the jaw bone, which helps to preserve the bone’s mass. Without this stimulation, the bone resorbs, a process of which bone mass “melts away”.

Resorption is to blame for dentures or partials that start to move or slip over time, even though the fit was snug when first made. Because resorption reduces bone height, the ridge the denture was contoured to fit begins to flatten. A shrinking ridge leaves the denture with an insufficient base.

The pace of bone loss speeds up a little more each year. The pressure of a denture on the ridge accelerates the rate. For people who sleep in their dentures or partials, the continual pressure ramps up the pace further.

As the ridge flattens, denture adhesives or pastes become of little help while trying to eat. This leads many denture wearers to switch to a diet of soft foods that dissolve easily in the mouth. Often, the pleasure of eating is overshadowed by trying to avoid sore spots on tender gum tissues or embarrassing slips.

Declining bone mass also leads to changes in facial appearance, contributing to an appearance that is far older than one’s actual age. As bone mass declines, jowls form as facial muscles detach from a shrinking bone mass. Deep wrinkles form around the mouth and the corners of the mouth turn downward, even in a smile. As bone loss becomes severe, the chin points and the nose moves closer to the chin, creating a ‘granny look.’

As an Asheville periodontist, my dental specialty includes the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Dental implants are the closest thing to natural teeth, for many reasons.

Dental implants restore the ability to bite and chew comfortably and without the fear of embarrassment or uncomfortable rubbing. Because implants are placed in the jaw bone, they have the same dependable foundation as that of natural teeth.

Among the many benefits of dental implants, they also provide stimulation to the jaw bone. This helps to halt the process of bone loss. For those who have already lost a great deal of bone loss, bone rebuilding procedures can be performed to restore a healthy, more youthful face shape.

An added advantage of implants is they do not rely on the crowning of otherwise healthy, neighboring teeth for the mere purpose of supporting a bridge. While a traditional crown-&-bridge combination relies on crowned teeth for support, an implant uses the sturdy foundation of your jaw bone.

There are over 40 different types of dental implant systems, each designed to accommodate specific needs and goals. For example, some implants are designed for placement in minimal bone mass. Others can be strategically placed to support a bridge of two or more teeth or support a full arch.

When choosing Dental Implants to replace teeth, you are making a lifelong investment. Since implants are designed to last a lifetime, they provide a ‘one & done’ choice for dependable tooth replacement. There are not many things these days that give you so much value!

If you struggle with dental fear or anxiety, rest assured that patient comfort – at every appointment – is of the highest priority. Our office is structured to attend to the specific needs of each patient, gently and respectfully. Patients begin with a consultation in a comfortable, private setting rather than seated in a treatment chair.

For patients who desire a “sleep” state, we offer oral sedation as well as I.V. sedation (twilight sleep). Oral sedation is a pill that helps patients relax. It also has an amnesiac effect, leaving most with little or no memory of treatment afterward.

I.V. sedation places the patient in a deeper sedative state (twilight sleep), also erasing memory of the procedure. It is administered by a doctor of anesthesiology for optimal comfort and safety.

With both, patients are closely monitored with advanced safety equipment throughout treatment. Patients also find our entire staff to be a unified team, each bringing a sincere level of compassion and commitment to excellent care.

Rather than bypass the very best option for replacing lost teeth, consider a consultation to discuss the benefits, anticipated costs, and treatment process. Call 828-274-9440 for an appointment in our Asheville periodontal dental office.

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