Be In-The-Know To Avoid Cavities, Gum Disease


Posted on Apr 02, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

During this highly unusual time, people are relying on the internet for communication (work and social), information, and entertainment. Computers, tablets and smart phones are keeping us connected as we ‘shelter in place’ until this global pandemic is under control.

A lot of Americans are using their “stuck inside” time to expand their minds. Whether it’s to enjoy an audio book, watch PBS specials, or learn how to do something on YouTube, using the time positively is helping people avoid getting mired down in worry and anxiety.

As a periodontal specialist in Asheville, NC, I hope adults will use some of their time to become more aware of the hazards of gum disease. The damage that periodontal disease (‘perio’) can have far reaching consequences, affecting the health inside and mouth and overall health, as I’ll explain.

People are often surprised to hear that they have developed gum disease since it is often without obvious symptoms in early stages. Once it’s fully underway, however, many people ignore the warning signs or assume they’ll “go away”.

In my dental specialty, I believe that by keeping Americans informed of how the progression of gum disease occurs could help to greatly reduce the extent of this disease, which plaques over 47 percent of adults.

Let’s begin by looking at the process of gum disease:

•  Oral Bacteria: The mouth is a warm, dark and moist environment — perfect for harboring bacteria. The mouth is the first point of contact for a large extent of the bacteria that enters the body. Bacteria is on food, utensils, lip gloss and even your tooth brush. All mouths have bacteria, some of it are beneficial. Although bacteria in the mouth are perfectly ‘normal’, the problem begins when too much bacteria accumulate.

•  Plaque: Without proper brushing, flossing, saliva flow and diet, oral bacteria can reproduce rapidly. For an example of just how quickly these bacteria accumulate, run your tongue over your teeth after brushing in the morning. They should feel slick and clean. Then, before brushing at bedtime, run your tongue over your teeth again. The accumulation of oral bacteria over the mere course of a day has likely formed a sticky film on teeth. This is known as plaque. This film is actually a coating of bacteria.

•  Tartar (or Calculus): In just 48 hours, unremoved plaque can harden into tartar. These ‘chunks’ are colonies of oral bacteria and typically attach to the base of teeth near the gum line. These cement-hard masses can no longer be brushed or flossed away. They must be removed by a dentist or hygienist with special tools. If allowed to remain, like plaque, tartar will continue to multiply as these bacterial colonies feed on tooth enamel and tender gum tissues.

•  Gingivitis: This is the first stage of gum disease. At this level, gum tissues are under attack and become sore. They may bleed easily when brushing and you may experience an aching sensation in some areas. Breath odor is stronger, even soon after brushing. At this point, with proper measures, you can restore your gums to a healthy state. However, the window of opportunity to combat gingivitis is brief.

•  Periodontal (Gum) Disease: At this stage, the gums are inflamed and tender. They begin to darken in color and the seal of gum tissues surrounding teeth begins to loosen. The breath is persistently bad. As this stage of gum disease worsens, it can lead to severe health risks elsewhere in the body.

•  Periodontitis: This is the advanced stage of gum disease. The gums are so tender that eating becomes difficult. Breath odor is putrid, as it reflects the rotting state in your mouth. The gum tissues are highly inflamed. Pus pockets may form on the gums near the base of teeth. Eventually, teeth will loosen as the gum tissues and bone structures that support them are destroyed. Tooth removal at this stage is not uncommon.

To no surprise, gum disease is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss. Yet, it’s one of the most preventable diseases with simple measures.

An even more concerning aspect of gum disease is its ability to enter the bloodstream. Once bloodborne, these infectious bacteria can trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. Gum disease bacteria has been linked to heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, stoke, memory loss, preterm babies, impotency, some cancers and even Alzheimer’s disease.

This is why we want you to be aware of the importance of having a healthy mouth. We realize there are financial obstacles for some people. However, most dental and specialty offices offer payment plans, many are interest free with no down payment required.

Some people avoid dental visits because they have anxiety or fears. Dental fear is fairly common, even in America where dental care is so advanced (in most practices). If deep fear or anxiety has prevented you from regular dental visits or having much-need treatment, finding a dentist who is experienced in caring for fearful patients is easier today.

Using advanced technology, such as laser dentistry, cone beam imaging, and other features, we are able to diagnose problems more precisely, which helps to minimize treatment. Many options enhance patient comfort and speed healing time.

For many fearful patients, we also offer oral or IV sedation (“twilight sleep”). We are fully equipped for the safety and comfort of administering sedatives for our patients for treatment in our office. Here, patients know us for our gentle touch and respectful, attentive care for each individual.

Occasionally, I hear a patient relay their impression of tooth loss being “just part of growing older.” That is far from the truth. The human body does ‘break down’ here and there but keeping your teeth for a lifetime is a reasonable expectation with proper measures.

Having healthy gums that support teeth can be achieved with an involved relationship with a dentist and a committed oral hygiene routine at home. With proper care, you can easily enjoy a smile of natural teeth all your life.

Twice daily brushing (at least two minutes per time), daily flossing, drinking ample water and limiting sweets and caffeine are simple ways to keep your mouth healthy between regular dental check-ups and cleanings. And, those 6-month check-ups are important. At this time, any tartar that has accumulated can be removed and signs of early gum disease can be noted.

Losing teeth due to gum disease leads to expensive and lifelong upkeep with crown-&-bridge, partials, full denture or dental implants. These tooth replacement needs can be avoided.

If you are experiencing symptoms of gum disease, call 828-274-9440. If fear is an obstacle to having a healthy, confident smile, begin with a consultation to discuss your needs.

 

Use Your ‘Sheltering In’ Time To Expand Dental Knowledge


Posted on Mar 25, 2020 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Whether by requirement or feeling the need to reduce susceptibility to COVID-19, many people in the U.S. are “sheltering in.” I think of how this is likened to the term “hunker down” when hurricanes or tornadoes are present. However, “sheltering in” is requiring lengthy periods of being housebound.

Although that may seem depressing, people all over the world are getting rather creative at how they’re managing. With the internet, we are able to stay connected, share jokes and encouragement, and relay tips and important info to one another.

You may have seen music being performed on the balconies of homes in Italy and by policemen in the streets of Germany. People who are close to hospitals are applauding the caregivers as they enter and leave.

There are many uplifting things occurring in the midst of this trying time. I hope you are using your time positively and keeping your mind and body active. These will help you get through this time with greater resilience and a ready-to-go attitude once our country is getting back to normal.

In the meantime, I thought I’d share some terms used in dentistry you may find helpful once dental offices are back up and operating on a normal schedule. Some include:

• Perio – This is actually a shortened version of ‘periodontal,’ which describes the pink, soft tissues in the mouth. Your periodontal health relates to your gum tissues, primarily.

• Buccal – This is dental lingo that refers to the front sides of teeth or gum tissues on the side of the cheeks.

• Lingual – This term describes the sides of teeth facing the tongue. A way to remember this is to think of the tongue “lingering” in the mouth and the sides of teeth and tissues surrounding it.

• Prophy – A prophy is actually a dental cleaning, which is meant to support the gum tissues by removing plaque and tartar that has accumulated on teeth since your last cleaning. A prophy is recommended every six months to help manage this buildup. When too much tartar (or calculus) accumulate on teeth, it can cause inflammation that goes deeper into gum tissues. Once this inflammation is active, a prophy likely won’t remove the extent of the damage nor halt its progress. When this occurs, the typical recommendation is a…

• Scaling & Root Planing – This procedure is a deep cleaning that goes beneath the surface of gum tissues and teeth. This is typically performed while the gums are numbed. Because some areas are time-consuming to clean, scaling and root planing is often performed in…

• Quadrants – A ‘quad,’ if you remember your high school math lessons, is a fourth of something. In the mouth, your quadrants are the top right side of the mouth, top left, lower right and lower left. If you use one of the newer electronic toothbrushes, you may get a ‘beep’ when it’s time to move from one quadrant to another. This allows you to give sufficient attention to each quadrant in the mouth so you’re doing a thorough job at each brushing.

• Pits and Fissures – Natural teeth may seem smooth. From a dentist’s view, each tooth has a distinct surface. This is especially true for teeth with larger “tops.” The grooves in these teeth are ideal hiding spots for bacteria since a toothbrush has a more difficult time sweeping them away. This is why some people have sealants applied, especially children who are still learning good brushing techniques.

• Bruxing – Simply, bruxing is the grinding or clenching of teeth, typically during sleep. Although tooth grinding is often blamed on stress or anxiety, it can also occur when teeth are misaligned (crooked).

Although we try not to use terminology that is unfamiliar to patients, we occasionally slip. Hopefully, you will speak up and question these so you stay fully informed as you make decisions that are best for your smile.

While your schedule may be anything but ‘normal’ during this period, we hope you’ll stay committed to your routine of twice daily brushing, flossing daily, limiting sugar and snacking, and drinking plenty of water to keep the mouth moist.

We look forward to “life as we know it” soon! Let’s pray this is short-lived and our nation is restored to a healthy, active country – with even greater appreciation for these gifts!

A Periodontal Specialist Explained


Posted on Dec 13, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Occasionally, I meet someone new who is unfamiliar with my specialty. Although a periodontist may seems to be a “behind the scenes” specialist, our focus actually has an upfront role in your oral health, and beyond.

A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal disease, and in the placement of dental implants. Periodontists are also experts in the treatment of oral inflammation. Periodontists receive extensive training in these areas, including three additional years of education beyond dental school.

In addition to having advanced training in the latest techniques for diagnosing and treating periodontal disease, a periodontal specialist is also trained in performing cosmetic procedures that involve gum tissues, such as correcting a “gummy smile”.

Periodontists often treat more problematic periodontal cases, such as people with severe gum disease or have a complex medical history. A periodontist offers a wide range of treatments, such as scaling and root planing (cleaning the infected surface of the root) or root surface debridement (removing damaged gum tissue).

Periodontal specialists can also treat patients with severe gum problems using a range of surgical procedures.

In addition, periodontists are specially trained in the placement, maintenance, and repair of dental implants.

During the initial appointment in our Asheville periodontal office, we typically begin with a review of the patient’s medical and dental histories. This information is important so we are aware of medications being taken or if the patient is being treated for any condition that can affect periodontal care, such as heart disease, diabetes, or pregnancy.

During the examination, we check the patient’s gums to look for gum line recession. We will also assess how the teeth fit together when biting, and check for any loose teeth. An important part of this exam is in the measuring of spaces between gum tissues at the base of teeth.

Using an instrument called a probe that is gently positioned between specific points surrounding each tooth, we determine the depth of periodontal “pockets”. These measurements help us assess the health of your gums. Images (x-rays) may also be taken to revealsthe health of the bone below the gum line.

Periodontal disease, also referred to as “gum disease,” often exists without an individual being aware of its presence. In its early stage, gingivitis, some people even assume that symptoms, such as seeing blood in the sink when brushing, are normal.

Obvious symptoms, such as pain, may not appear until the disease has reached an advanced stage. This is why it is important to be familiar with the signs and symptoms, which include:

• Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
• Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or when eating certain foods
• Gums that are receding (pulling away from the teeth) or make the appear teeth longer than normal
• Loose or separating teeth
• Pus between your gums and teeth
• Sores in your mouth
• Persistent bad breath
• A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
• A change in the fit of partial dentures

If you notice any of these symptoms, be sure to contact your dentist or periodontist without delay. Gum disease will only worsen without treatment.

Who Should See a Periodontist?
Some patients’ periodontal needs can be managed by their general dentist. However, patients who are experiencing signs and symptoms of moderate or severe levels of gum disease or have more complex cases receive the most efficient and effective care through team treatment between a general dentist and periodontist.

Restoring your gums to a healthy state is important! As research continually shows, gum health is intricately connected to overall health. Oral bacteria of periodontal disease has been linked as a trigger for more and more chronic diseases, including heart disease, some cancers, stroke, memory loss, diabetes, and arthritis. Having prompt periodontal treatment by a trained periodontal specialist may lower the risk for more serious, and even deadly, diseases and health conditions.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms associated with periodontal disease, a referral is not required. Call 828-274-9440 and we will be happy to assist you.

If you do not have a general dentist, we can also refer some who are near to you and we know to provide gentle, thorough and appropriate care for their patients’ needs.

Obesity Increases Risk Of Gum Disease.


Posted on Nov 20, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Imagine one-third of your body being made up of maple syrup.

Sounds pretty absurd, doesn’t it? Yet, for Americans who are categorically obese, this imagery is actually a good description.

Obesity is when fat makes up over thirty percent of body mass. According to the Centers For Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), adults in the U.S. who are categorized as obese is at nearly 40 percent! Another 30 percent are categorized at overweight. That’s two-thirds of adults in the U.S. who have too much fat makeup.

And it’s not just adults over the age of 20 who have this problem. Sadly, nearly 30 percent of children are overweight or obese as well.

In North Carolina, over 63 percent of adults are either overweight or obese, according to a study by the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study.  (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/oby.20451)

The problems associated with being overweight and obese are many, and can be deadly. Obesity seems to trigger a predisposition to a variety of serious health conditions and diseases. These include increased risk of stroke, certain cancers, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes.

In addition to the added and unnecessary load that strains the back, knees and ankles, the challenges continue. Obesity decreases lifespan, up to an estimated 20 percent of people who are severely obese. (https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsr043743)

As 2019 holiday indulgences (often sugary and carb-laden) are before us, many of us also follow the season with with the traditional new year’s resolution of “lose weight” at the top of the list. Along with improved health and greater confidence in overall appearance, we’d like to add another reason to reach your goal.

Chronic inflammation is a known side effect obesity. Why does this matter to a Periodontist? Obesity is also known to exacerbate other inflammatory disorders, including periodontitis (advanced gum disease).  To be clear, periodontal disease is also the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Research has shown that obese adults have a 6 times higher potential to develop periodontal (gum) disease. As a periodontal specialist my goal is always to help patients achieve optimal oral health. Although discussing the risks of periodontal disease with obese patients can be a sensitive issue, this is without judgement of why they are overweight but rather how we can help them enjoy a healthier smile.

Most of us know – losing weight is not a process that is either easy or quick. Add to this that research has shown that factors such as sleep quality and what we eat (as much as how much we eat) can cause the brain to make the challenges of weight loss even greater.

For one, studies have shown that sugar can be addictive. Sugar consumption even activates the same regions in the brain that react to cocaine. For individuals who admit to having a “sweet tooth,” trying to stay within the recommended 6 teaspoons per day limit can be a battle when we are truly “addicted.”  (https://www.brainmdhealth.com/blog/what-do-sugar-and-cocaine-have-in-common/)

Insufficient sleep also complicates the brain’s ability to regulate hunger hormones, known as ghrelin and leptin. Ghrelin stimulates the appetite while leptin sends signals of feeling full. When the body is sleep-deprived, the level of ghrelin rises while leptin levels decrease. This leads to an increase in hunger.

The National Sleep Foundation states that “people who don’t get enough sleep eat twice as much fat and more than 300 extra calories the next day, compared with those who sleep for eight hours.” (https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/the-connection-between-sleep-and-overeating)

As difficult as losing weight can be, it is important to be aware of risk factors that can make you more suspectible to gum disease. Initial symptoms include gums that are tender, swollen, and may bleed when brushing. This stage, known as gingivitis, is actually reversible with prompt, thorough oral hygiene.

As gum disease worsens, however, the inflammation of oral bacteria can lead to persistent bad breath, receded gums that expose sensitive tooth roots, and gums that darken in color. If untreated, pus pockets can eventually form and the base of some teeth and tooth loosening can require removal.

Armed with this information, we want to help all patients, with overweight or obese adults especially, to take added precautions to maintain good oral health, both at home and through regular dental check-ups.

Avoiding periodontal disease is particularly important since its infectious bacteria have been linked to serious health problems. These include heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, some cancers, preterm babies, impotency, and Alzheimer’s disease.

If you are experiencing symptoms of gum disease, however, it is vital to be seen by a periodontist as soon as possible to halt further progression. A periodontist is a dental specialist who has advanced training in treating all stages of gum disease as well as in the placement of dental implants. The earlier the treatment, the less involved treatment requirements will be. Gum disease will not improve without professional care.

Call 828-274-9440 to schedule an initial examination or begin with a consultation.

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