What’s Keeping You From The Dentist’s Office?


Posted on Oct 19, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

As an Periodontist in Asheville NC, I’ve treated many patients who, to no surprise, developed periodontal (gum) disease because of NOT going to a dentist on a regular basis.

According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), nearly 65 percent of adults aged 18 and over had at least one dental visit in the past year (based on 2019).

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/dental.htm

Unfortunately, that leaves 35 percent of adults who did not.

The reason it is recommended to see a dentist for exams and cleanings TWICE A YEAR is because tartar, which is hardened plaque, can cause cavities and gum disease. One plaque hardens into tartar, it can no longer be brushed or flossed away. It must be removed by a dentist or hygienist using special tools.

Tartar is actually a mass of oral bacteria, which has attached itself to the base of (or in-between) teeth. Tartar (also referred to as calculus), is a colony of bacteria that thrive on oral tissues. Bacteria are living organisms and reproduce rapidly. And, the more there are, the more rapidly they amass.

So, what are the common excuses for avoiding regular dental care? See if you’ve been guilty of one or more:

COST – Some individuals feel dental cleanings and exams are expensive. Actually, there is a great deal of time and training that goes into your individualized care. In addition to the measures of sterilization and instruments, hygienists and dentists are highly-trained, educated, and must stay board certified. As for the investment, these visits are what help you avoid the need for a filling, gum disease, potential damage to teeth due to bite misalignment, and even catch oral cancer at early stages. If dental insurance is not possible, ask if payment plans are available. Many dental offices offer these, most of which are interest-free with no down payment required.

DENTAL FEAR – If fear or anxiety keeps you away from a dental chair, you are not alone. It is estimated that over 70 percent of American adults have some level of this. Sometimes the fear exists because of a traumatic experience in the past or feeling helpless in the chair. Some people react to certain smells and sounds. A few have no idea what prompted their fear, but know it is beyond their control. For these, we advise seeking dental care in a modernized office. Today’s advanced technology has greatly enhanced the level of comfort during care as well as reduced treatment time. Too, offices such as our Asheville periodontal dental office offer oral sedation as well as IV sedation (twilight sleep). These are administered by highly-skilled professionals who oversee the patient using advanced safety monitoring equipment. Ask for a consultation and tour before choosing the office that is reassuring to your unique needs.

DREAD OF BEING LECTURED – If it’s been years since you’ve seen a dentist, you may be expecting a lecture from the dentist or hygienist (or both!). My staff and I believe that is a sure way to deter someone from cultivating a positive attitude towards their dental relationship. We all want to feel respected and having a caregiver talk “down” to you is unfair, especially because no one knows the story behind your delay or avoidance. If you feel that’s going to be a problem, say so. Be upfront with “a lecture is not going to help me.” If you feel it’s a recurring problem, ask to have your records transferred to an office where you are treated more appropriately.

FEAR OF EMBARRASSMENT – Some adults feel awkward having their denture or partial removed at the dentist’s office. Some people fear they’ll gag during care, which can trigger coughing and even throwing up. Some feel their mouths are so “bombed out” that it’s embarrassing to have a dentist see how much damage has occurred. To reassure you, there is nothing we haven’t seen or experienced. Dentists have quite a lot thrown at us during dental school. As a specialist in periodontics, my additional training covered even more in-depth and complex damage or disease. DO NOT worry about your caregivers. They WANT you to rely on them to help you. Almost any dentist or specialist will tell you that our greatest joy comes from taking a patient from a “hopeless” mouth to a patient who has a healthy, confident smile!

TIME IN TREATMENT – Today’s advanced technology has greatly condensed the time needed to accurately diagnose and treatment plan almost any dental problem. Many treatments can be completed in just one or two visits. For those who have more extensive needs, dentists can sometimes combine several appointments into one long one. This is made much easier for the patient with the addition of oral sedation. Oral sedation creates a totally relaxed state so the patient can “doze” in and out of treatment. It has a quick recovery and sedated patients are carefully monitored for safety and comfort throughout treatment.

Regardless of WHY you’ve avoided the dentist, your smile is worth it! Having an appealing smile you feel joyful in sharing adds to your mood, enhances appearance and makes a positive impression to others.

If you’ve avoided dental care for years (or even decades), you may have signs or symptoms of periodontal disease. These include tender gums that may bleed when brushing, gums that recede from the base of some teeth, gums that turn red in color, and frequent bad breath. Gums are the foundation for teeth, so without healthy gums, your teeth will not be healthy, either.

Too, gum disease will only worsen without treatment. If you are a reader of my articles, you may have read the findings of research that correlates the bacteria of gum disease with serious health conditions. These include stroke, heart disease, preterm babies, some cancers, arthritis, diabetes, and erectile dysfunction.

Let us help you feel the positive aspects of achieving a healthy smile. Begin with a consultation by calling 828-274-9440.

Postponing Dental Care Can Be Expensive


Posted on Sep 29, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Most of us have seen the movie, “Gone With The Wind,” It’s pretty hard to forget the last line of Scarlet O’Hara: “I’ll think about that tomorrow.”

Procrastination is something we all do, some more than others. We all tend to “back burner” things we don’t want to do. As a periodontal dental specialist, I’m guilty of this on occasion.

However, I see a number of patients who have developed periodontal (gum) disease because they delayed or postponed dental care; care that would have easily helped them avoid the problems associated with it.

The reason 6-month dental check-ups are so beneficial is in their ability to give patients a twice-a-year clean slate in oral wellness. During this time, the dentist and hygienist can examine the mouth for signs of abnormal wear, bite alignment, and point out areas that need extra attention in oral hygiene routines at home. (This is especially true for people who have crowded or crooked teeth, as bacteria can easily accumulate in these tight angles.)

This dental appointment also allows the hygienist to remove plaque or tartar that has formed since the patient’s last check-up. Both are accumulations of oral bacteria, which will continue to reproduce rapidly without regular removal.

Plaque starts the process. It is the sticky film you probably feel on teeth when you first wake up. This film is actually a layer of bacteria that has rapidly reproduced during the night. (If you snore or breathe through your mouth during sleep, oral dryness can accelerate the rate of reproduction even more.)

Although it is more obvious on teeth, the film of plaque also coats the gum tissues and tongue. If not thoroughly removed within 48 hours, these bacteria amass to such a level that the plaque hardens. This is known as tartar.

Tartar typically forms between teeth and at the base of teeth. This is why daily flossing is helpful. It scrapes off plaque in areas the toothbrush may not reach, or may not be cleaning sufficiently.

Once tartar forms, however, it can no longer be removed by brushing and flossing. This is what the hygienist is picking at and scraping off teeth during dental cleanings. If not removed, these bacterial colonies continue to grow. And bacteria breed at an amazingly fast pace.

Just how quickly can these oral bacteria amass?

According to information shared by RDH Magazine: (https://www.rdhmag.com/infection-control/water-safety/article/16404976/oral-bacteria-how-many-how-fast)

“some species of oral bacteria can double their numbers every 20 minutes under ideal conditions in a Petri dish.”

This means that one million bacteria can grow to 14 million within an hour. Accumulated bacteria can even be seen in the mouth as a white coating on the tongue. The back of the tongue is typically whiter in color since tooth brushing doesn’t reach there and dislodge embedded bacteria. (This is why it’s important to brush your tongue every day when toothbrushing, or use a tongue scraper.)

Tartar holds such a high number of bacteria that these organisms can cause damage to teeth. They bore into tooth enamel and eat away at oral tissues.

Bacteria are ramped up by foods we eat. They especially love lingering food particles caught between teeth and foods containing sugar. (This is yet another reason to floss daily.)

Initially, gum disease causes tender gums that may be swollen. They may bleed when brushing, which is typically noticed when spitting. Symptoms may also include frequent bad breath, gums that are more red in color than a healthy pink, and soreness when brushing or flossing.

Keep in mind, this is just the beginning. This stage is known as Gingivitis and is just a prelude of what’s to come. If prompt measures are taken as soon as these symptoms arise, Gingivitis may be overcome without  requiring dental treatment. Thorough brushing (twice a day, at least), daily flossing, and keeping the mouth moist with plain water may be effective in overcoming Gingivitis.

If not resolved, Gingivitis can progress to periodontal disease. During this level of gum disease, breath odor is persistently bad. The gums bleed easily when brushing and are more red in color. Gums are sore and tender. As the disease worsens, the gums become spongy and pus pockets may form at the base of teeth.

Eventually, the bone tissues and gums become so damaged by periodontal bacteria that some teeth may loosen. This stage is periodontitis and is an infectious disease that can cause devastation far beyond the mouth.

Periodontal disease is the nation’s number one cause of adult tooth loss.

These potent bacteria can enter the bloodstream, creating inflammatory reactions that can activate or worsen a number of serious health problems. These include heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, arthritis, preterm babies, some cancers, impotency, erectile dysfunction, and Alzheimer’s disease.

That’s a pretty serious list. As research continues to study the far-reaching effects of these infectious bacteria, the list seems to lengthen more.

Have you been putting off dental care? Treating advanced gum disease and replacing teeth are both pretty involved procedures.

In many cases, I’ve found patients avoid or delay dental care due to feeling it is too expensive or having fear associated with dental visits. Yet, the price (in time and money) from not properly caring for oral health is steep in many ways.

The devastation caused by these bacteria can be easily avoided with simple measures at home and 6-month dental visits. An at-home dental care regimen should only require about 5 minutes per day. A dental check-up usually takes about an hour.

If you are very uncomfortable during dental cleanings, tell your hygienist. He or she may be able to provide a pre-treatment rinse or a topical swab for more sensitive areas. (Just know that until your gums get into healthier shape, it is the inflammation caused by oral bacteria that makes them more sensitive.)

The obstacles that typically prevent patients from receiving the care they need are:

Cost: Most dental practices offer payment plans that are interest-free with no down payment required. If you don’t have dental insurance, ask about any discounts they may offer or consider using a credit card.

Dental fear: In our Asheville periodontal dental office, we offer both oral and I.V. sedation (“twilight sleep”), if desired. We understand that many adults have anxiety or fear when it comes to dental treatment. Our entire staff is committed to providing all patients with a gentle touch, a respectful environment, and compassionate care.

Embarrassment or feeling a smile is “hopeless”: We see many adults who have “bombed out” mouths. This can happen for a number of reasons. Here, we are a “judgement-free” perio office and treat every patient as we would want our loved ones treated. And, no smile is hopeless. We have a great many patients who are testaments to that!

For patients who have lost natural teeth, for whatever reason, a periodontist has advanced skills in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants. Once your gums are restored to a healthy state, we can discuss that tooth replacement option, if you like.

As with most things in life, delaying care is a sure recipe to get deeper in the problem. Be committed to your daily oral care routine and keeping regular dental appointments. If you are having symptoms associated with any stage of gum disease, however, I am a dental specialist in treating even advanced levels.

Call 828-274-9440. A referral is not needed.

 

 

 

 

Misconceptions Of Oral Health


Posted on Sep 14, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

As a periodontal dental specialist, I have advanced skills in the treatment of gum disease and dental implants. In my specialty, I see patients who have various issues related to oral health. Some of these can be resolved with minor treatment and others require more involved procedures.

In many cases, however, a factor in the severity of certain issues occur because it was assumed the problem would resolve itself. Some patients have also assumed that certain signs or symptoms were “normal”.

The health of the mouth is largely reliant on the condition of the gum tissues. This moist, soft covering of tissues is a protective blanket for the structures underneath. Gum tissues protect the structures that support natural teeth as well as their roots.

Yet, because the gums are not visible as are teeth, it is easy to “back burner” problems. Some of these problems DO resolve on their own. However, in too many cases, what is set aside eventually requires extensive treatment; treatment that may have easily been avoided with early care.

I’d like to address some of the more common issues I see that are misconceptions…

Assuming seeing blood in the sink when brushing teeth is normal: Srubbing teeth so rigorously that they bleed is not a sign of doing a good job. This action not only wears away precious tooth enamel, it wears away the gum tissues that wrap the base of teeth.

Gums that bleed when brushing are also a symptom of periodontal (gum) disease. In addition, gum disease can cause tenderness, swelling or frequent bad breath. Without treatment, gum disease will progress further. This is why it is the nation’s leading cause of adult tooth loss.

Protect tooth enamel and gum tissues by using a soft to medium bristled toothbrush and a non-abrasive toothpaste (never substances such as baking soda). Using a swirling motion (rather than going back-&-forth), avoid applying too much pressure. Make sure that the tips of the bristles are contacting the surfaces of teeth. Hint: If you notice your toothbrush’s bristles flay outward after a month or so of use, you’re pressing too hard.

Ignoring gum recession: The gums are designed to snugly wrap the base of each tooth, serving to seal out bacteria. Although the aging process and oral dryness can shrink gum tissues, a common cause of receded gums is gum disease.

Gum recession is what causes sensitivity to hot, cold or the bristles of a toothbrush. Oftentimes, a bite of ice cream can send a jolt of pain. Even without the sensitivity, recession can leave the darker tooth root areas exposed. This leaves the tooth vulnerable to damage by oral bacteria.

Ignoring frequent bad breath: Bad breath is typically a by-product of bacteria build up. Although certain medical conditions can contribute to bad breath, keeping oral bacteria levels under control will minimize the risk of having smelly breath odor.

Saliva is what controls a significant amount of oral bacteria. However, without regular brushing and flossing, bacteria can quickly exceed what saliva is able to manage.

This is why it is important to brush twice daily and floss daily. These small tasks help to control bacteria by removing the sticky buildup of plaque. If not removed, plaque hardens into what is known as tartar. Tartar is a destructive mass of bacteria that can no longer be brushed or flossed away.

Having gum depth measurements of four and over: During regular check-ups, hygienists check gum health by gently using a probe along the base of each tooth. This is done to indicate loosening of gum tissues on the front and back sides of teeth. A good check-up will have no depth measurement higher than a three.

If the depth measures a 4 or 5 (or higher), the gums are not sealing out oral bacteria sufficiently. This may be an indication of gum disease. The higher the number, the more advanced it is.

Assuming tooth loss is normal: Some people assume tooth loss is a natural part of the aging process. This is not accurate. Adults lose teeth due to accidents, decay or (most often) gum disease.

Occasionally, a tooth that needs crowning or filling is deemed a “problem” tooth. This causes some people to want the tooth removed rather than repaired. Yet, missing tooth roots in the jaw bone triggers a process of bone shrinkage. This is known as resorption.

Resorption occurs without the stimulating presence of the tooth root. As the bone declines in height and width, neighboring teeth can also be affected. Adjacent tooth roots in areas of insufficient bone structure are at a higher risk of cavities, gum disease, and tooth breaks or fractures. Statistics show that a tooth adjacent to a missing tooth is most likely the next to be lost.

When a tooth must be removed, we recommend replacing it with a dental implant. Because an implant is positioned in the bone, it helps halt bone loss and protect the well-being of neighboring teeth.

Not reacting to spots on the tongue, lips or inside the cheek: People occasionally develop canker sores inside the mouth. These can be caused by stress or having an acidic diet. Both should go away within ten days or so.

Any spot or change inside the mouth or throat that does not resolve on its own within two weeks should be seen immediately. This may be a sign of oral cancer and may appear as a red or white spot. Or, it may cause hoarseness or difficulty swallowing. If caught early, oral cancer can be successfully treated. Acting promptly is highly important as it can lead to disfiguring treatment and be even deadly.

Assuming oral health is contained in the mouth: It has been shown that having good oral health is an advantage to having good overall health. The potent bacteria of gum disease can enter the bloodstream and cause inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body. Research has correlated a number of serious health problems with the infectious bacteria of gum disease. These include heart disease, stroke, some cancers, Alzheimer’s disease and arthritis.

As an Asheville periodontist, I believe that adults can improve their oral health by being informed patients and committed to having a healthy smile.

A good resource on maintaining good oral health is the web site of the American Academy of Periodontology: www.perio.org (go to Patient Resources). Or, call our Asheville periodontal dental office at 828-274-9440.

 

 

Be “Sweet” To Your Smile By Monitoring Sugar Intake


Posted on Aug 31, 2021 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

If Americans truly calculated the amount of sugar they’ve consumed at the end of each day, I believe most would be shocked. Even unintentionally, sugar intake can easily reach levels that are far beyond what is assumed.

For example, in a 2015 Washington Post article, it was reported that 25 percent of catsup is sugar. Alarmingly, one tablespoon has four grams of sugar, which is more sugar than a typical chocolate chip cookie.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/do-you-know-how-much-sugar-is-in-your-ketchup/2015/06/02/9496b77e-fe5f-11e4-833c-a2de05b6b2a4_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.67cb41e9706b

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a maximum of no more than 10 teaspoons of free sugars per day. Regardless of age, the WHO advises keeping daily sugar consumption to less than 10 percent of calories “to reduce the risk of unhealthy weight gain and dental caries.”

https://www.who.int/news/item/04-03-2015-who-calls-on-countries-to-reduce-sugars-intake-among-adults-and-children

However, our goal in limiting sugar is often sabotaged by hidden sugars.

Sugar comes in far more forms than just the white or brown bags of granular “cane sugar” we purchase in the grocery store. If you read the list of ingredients in foods and beverages, you may be surprised at how many forms of sugar are concealed with different names. At this time, there are more than sixty.

Here’s how to catch some of them:

Added sugar may be listed as syrup (examples are corn syrup or rice syrup) or anything with an ingredient that ends in “ose” (such as fructose, sucrose, maltose, dextrose). Other examples of added sugar include fruit nectars, juice concentrates, honey, agave and molasses.

Ideally, the WHO urges an intake of no more than 6 teaspoons (or less than 5 percent) of sugars per day to “provide additional health benefits.” This is an ambitious goal for Americans who have become literally addicted to sugar.

In a study of lab rats who were provided with a diet of food and intermittent supplies of sugar water, the results showed indications of addiction and symptoms of withdrawal. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0149763407000589?via%3Dihub

The study spurned on a succession of additional studies. In one, it was noted that sugar “lights up” the same area of the brain as cocaine.

https://www.businessinsider.com/sugar-has-a-similar-effect-on-the-brain-as-cocaine-2016-4

As a periodontist, I’m especially concerned about sugar intake to the detriment of oral health. Sugar lowers the natural pH levels in saliva and triggers a process that is the beginning of tooth demineralization. Demineralization describes the process where the enamel and tooth structures are dissolved.

Although sugar is not a healthy food choice for any part of the body, it is important to remember that it is the mouth that is the entry point for what we eat or drink. Thus, the destructive nature of sugar begins by causing an imbalance in the mouth through altering the healthy formulation of saliva.

For a minute, think of the foods you consumed yesterday. Coffee with sweetened creamer? Toast with jam? Sweet tea with lunch? A candy bar and cola as a mid-afternoon snack? Catsup over your fries at dinner, followed by a bowl of ice-cream?

When we are conscious of just how much sugar is being consumed over the course of a day, it becomes easier to make better choices. As we taper down little by little, it actually helps us to “wean” off the dependency of sugar so it doesn’t feel like deprivation.

As an Asheville Periodontist, I see patients every day who have periodontal disease, cavities and missing teeth that can be attributed to diet, smoking and insufficient oral hygiene. Many face involved treatment decisions that can be costly and take months to accomplish.

 

Although we pride ourselves on providing our patients with a comfortab

le experience backed by advanced skills and technology, so much of our treatment can be prevented with easy proactive measures. Eating a healthy diet, keeping the mouth moist, brushing and flossing, and seeing a dentist regularly are all practical ways to keep a healthy, confident smile.

Yet, “we don’t know what we don’t know.” Because our population is largely unaware of the extent of sugars in many foods and beverages, it is easy to consume far more than is realized.

Take charge of your oral health by reading food labels, meal planning that limits sugars, and being highly committed to your oral hygiene routine at home. A few tips for a healthy mouth between dental check-ups are:

Brush twice a day (at least) for two minutes each time. Use a fluoride toothpaste with a soft to medium bristle toothbrush.
Floss your teeth every day before your brush to dislodge food particles caught between teeth. If flossing is difficult for you, try one of the water flossers. These are affordable and as effective as manual flossing.
Brush your tongue after your teeth to unroot embedded bacteria, especially reaching the back area of the tongue (where most bacteria are embedded).
• Use an oral rinse that replenishes moisture twice a day (or as directed). These are available at most drug stores.
• Chew sugarless gum, preferably a brand that contains Xylitol. Xylitol looks and tastes like sugar, yet has 40 percent fewer calories.
• Drink plenty of water throughout the day. Be aware that beverages such as most coffee, tea and colas contain caffeine are drying to the mouth. Many medications also have the side effect of oral dryness – another good reason to stay hydrated.

Also, be aware of the signs and symptoms of gum disease. Sore, tender, bleeding, swollen or red gums are all warning signs. With prompt measures, we can greatly minimize treatment needs to rid your mouth of this dangerous bacteria that has been associated with a number of serious health problems (including stroke and some cancers).

If you haven’t seen your general dentist on a regular basis, call 828-274-9440. Our Asheville periodontal office can help to restore your mouth to a healthy state with the most conservative, yet effective, treatment possible.

 

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