Know The Unseen Risks Of Wearing Dentures


Posted on Sep 19, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

As an Asheville periodontist, my goal is to provide each patient with the very best so they can enjoy a healthy, confident smile. For patients who have lost one or more natural teeth, some come to me because they want to avoid ending up having to wear a full or partial denture. For those who wear one and are unhappy with the feel and function, we are sought out as specialists in the diagnosis and placement of dental implants.

Denture wearers, especially those who have worn dentures for many years, can quickly become dissatisfied with the uncomfortable rubbing and difficulty eating foods they once enjoyed. Although their ‘appliance’ may have fit well when first made, changes in the fit, over time, are due to what is taking place below the gum tissues. These changes aren’t obvious, at first.

When first made, a denture is custom-designed to fit snugly to the unique contours of the gum ridge. This ‘ridge’ is the raised arch where natural teeth were once held. Over time, denture wearers begin to notice that the denture moves while chewing certain foods. This can rub sore spots on gums. As the denture loosens more, even using denture adhesives or pastes don’t help much.

Denture patients also learn that it can be painful for something as small as a sesame seed to become trapped between their denture and gums, piercing into tender gum tissues. Some people eventually switch to a diet of soft foods that dissolve easily to avoid rigorous chewing. Because of fear of embarrassing slips, others begin to decline social invitations when they are centered around food.

The problem for a denture wearer is what is happening underneath the gums. The looser fit is not because the denture has expanded – it’s the decline of the jaw bone. This occurs with the absence of tooth roots, which once provided nourishment and stimulation to the bone that supported them.

When natural tooth roots are removed, the jaw bone begins to shrink. This decline in bone mass also contributes to changes in facial appearance, such as deep wrinkling around the mouth and the formation of jowls.

The process of bone loss continues as the gum ridge your denture was contoured to flattens. Relines may temporarily adjust the denture to accommodate some of the change. However, as the jaw bone continues to decline, the denture continues to be difficult to keep in place.

The denture itself merely adds to the problem of bone loss. The pressure of wearing a denture actually accelerates the rate of bone loss. Since a number of denture wearers also sleep in their dentures, the 24/7 pressure speeds this rate even more.

Long-time denture wearers often complain that they are not able to chew, with some admitting they have to even remove their denture to eat. Fear of embarrassment is another common complaint. Speaking, laughing and even sneezing in the presence of others can create embarrassing moments that leave lasting impressions.

The solution to these problems – dental implants. Not only do implants restore the ability to bite and chew comfortably, they halt bone loss that is associated with dentures. Because they are held by the jaw bone, just as natural tooth roots once were, implants recreate the stimulation needed by the jaw bone to maintain its mass.

Does your denture bring to mind words like rocky, wobbly and slippery? If so, the problem will only worsen over time. When people choose dental implants to replace an ill-fitting denture, they can smile, laugh and chew with confidence.

Eating a healthy diet, socializing with friends and family, and feeling confident are essential to a healthy, happy life. Call our friendly Asheville periodontal dental office: 828-254-9440 to schedule an initial appointment. (A referral is not required). During this time, I’ll explain the type of implants that may be best for your needs as well as comfort options, including oral and IV sedation (“twilight sleep”). We are also happy to discuss estimated costs and payment options.

Men Have Greater Risks For Dental Problems.


Posted on Aug 20, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

Research has found that periodontal disease is higher in men (56.4 percent) than in women (38.4 percent). https://www.perio.org/consumer/gum-disease-and-men

The reason for this significantly higher number may be due to some findings revealed through some unsettling findings. According to a survey by the Centers For Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), only 66 percent of males brush their teeth twice or more a day compared with 86 percent of females who do so.

This was revealed through a study of over 800 participants. Evaluation included a written questionnaire on dental knowledge and oral health habits. It also included an oral exam of each participant to detect signs of periodontal disease. (https://www.perio.org/consumer/gender-differences)

Flossing had even worse numbers, but that pertains to both sexes. Only 49 percent in the survey stated they floss on a daily basis. Only 1 out of 3 assumed that seeing blood in the sink when brushing is normal and were unaware it is a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

While women were as twice as likely to see their dentist for regular dental check-ups, they were also more likely to follow through with recommended dental treatment than men. As a result, the study revealed women had better levels of gum health with less dental plaque, calculus, and bleeding.

The Journal of Periodontology shared nine risk factors for tooth loss due to periodontal (gum) disease, including …

• Being over age 35
• Being male
• Not having professional dental care
• Not brushing teeth
• Smoking
• Being diabetic
• Having high blood pressure
• Having RA (rheumatoid arthritis)

Although age and gender are unchangeable, decisions to not brush your teeth or to smoke, for example, are something you can control. As of 2017, 18.6 percent of American men smoke, compared with 14.3 percent of women. (https://www.edrugstore.com/blog/current-health-news/men-smoke-more/) Because more males smoke cigarettes (or use tobacco in other forms), they are more likely to develop gum disease.

Why should you worry about gum disease? In addition to causing tooth loss, oral bacteria can enter then bloodstream through tears in diseased tissues in the mouth. Once in the bloodstream, this bacteria can trigger inflammatory reactions elsewhere in the body.

The bacteria of gum disease has been linked to heart disease, stroke, memory loss, preterm babies, arthritis, diabetes, and even impotency. According to the American Academy of Periodontology (perio.org), men who fail to maintain good oral health are also at higher risk for:

PROSTATE PROBLEMS – Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an enzyme created in the prostate that is normally secreted in very small amounts. However, when the prostate becomes inflamed, infected, or affected by cancer, PSA levels rise. Research has shown that men with indicators of periodontal disease such as red, swollen or tender gums  as well as prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate) have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of the conditions. This means that prostate health may be associated with periodontal health, and vice versa.

HEART DISEASE – Research indicates that periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease are associated; having periodontal disease may actually increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions, and researchers believe that inflammation is the connection between gum disease and heart disease. Since men are already more likely to develop heart disease than women, maintaining periodontal health is another way to reduce this risk.

IMPOTENCE – Men with periodontal disease, especially those younger than 30 or older than 70, are at increased risk of developing impotence, according to research. Researchers believe that inflammation may be the link between the two conditions; prolonged chronic inflammation (the same type of inflammation that is associated with periodontal disease) can damage blood vessels leading to impotence.

CANCER – Research has found that men with a history of gum disease are 14 percent more likely to develop cancer than men with healthy gums. Specifically, men with periodontal disease may be 49 percent more likely than women to develop kidney cancer, 54 percent more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, and 30 percent more likely to develop blood cancers.

If you aren’t concerned about losing teeth, these overall health risks should get your attention. Treating gum disease before it becomes severe can be done comfortably and affordably. In our Asheville periodontal dental office, we use the latest technology and offer I.V. sedation for those who desire a “twilight sleep” state during treatment.

Gum disease will only worsen without treatment. Call (828) 274-9440 if you have tender, sore gums or see blood in the sink when brushing. You need to be seen promptly.

React To Gum Disease EARLY To Save Time & Money On Treatment.


Posted on Aug 08, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

“Hindsight is 20-20.” 

This saying describes how, if we’d “known then what we know now…” we may have taken a different course of action for a better outcome.

In cases where gum disease develops or tooth loss occurs, patients often wish they could turn back the hands of time. Many patients who have acquired gum disease or had teeth replaced because of it are now highly-committed to their oral health. They often tell us, “I wish I’d taken better care of my mouth before,” now realizing how problems can be avoided as well as the benefits of good oral health.

Periodontal (gum) disease and (often) its subsequent tooth loss are, simply put, products of bacterial overload in the mouth. Our mouths are constantly being supplied with sustenance for these organisms. Bacteria are able to thrive through food that enters, especially sugars, and other bacteria-laden items put into the mouth. As bacteria thrive, they are able to reproduce very rapidly.

When bacteria levels become more than the immune system can tackle, infection can set in. Just as a cut or scrape on the skin that is not kept sufficiently clean can become infected, oral bacteria can cause an infection to develop in the mouth. This accumulation of bacteria can evolve into gum disease, which is an inflammation that attacks teeth, oral tissues and the bone structures that support tooth roots.

Gum disease symptoms include sore gums that bleed when brushing, frequent bad breath, gums that pull away from the base around teeth, gums that darken in color. As it worsens, pus pockets may form on the gums at the base of some teeth. In advanced stages, gum disease causes teeth to loosen and eventually require removal.

Gum disease often progresses because people are unaware that bleeding or receding gums is actually a symptom. Insufficient brushing, failing to floss and not having regular dental cleanings form a path that begin the process.

Insufficient care can lead to a build-up of bacteria, known as plaque. Plaque is a sticky (or “fuzzy”) film you feel on teeth when not removed on a regular basis. In just 48 hours, plaque can transform into a cement-hard colony of oral bacteria that attaches to teeth. This hardened form of bacteria is known as tartar or calculus. Unlike plaque, tartar cannot be brushed or flossed away.

As your mouth is enduring the repercussions of oral bacteria accumulation, gum tissues and tooth enamel are attacked. Once this infectious bacteria has penetrated below the gum line, dental treatment is necessary to halt its continued development and restore healthy gums

With prompt and proper measures, however, you can halt and reverse the need for dental treatment and avoid the repercussions of gum disease.

Gingivitis is the initial stage of gum disease. Symptoms typically include gums that are tender in spots and some bleeding when you brush. These are warning signs that signal an immediate need for attention.

Begin by twice daily brushing with a soft bristle tooth brush and use a fluoridated tooth paste. Brush for at least two minutes each time. Floss daily. Be sure not to pop the floss between teeth to avoid damaging tender gums. Move the floss in a back-&-forth motion between teeth to ease it down so you can scrape the sides of each tooth.

You can remove a tremendous amount of oral bacteria by using a tongue scrapper daily. Or, brush your tongue with your tooth brush at the end of each brushing. This helps to dislodge bacteria that is embedded in the grooves of the tongue.

Drink lots of water during the day. This will help keep saliva flow at ample levels. Saliva is designed to move oral bacteria from the mouth on a consistent basis. Oral dryness is the enemy. Avoid foods and beverages that are drying to oral tissues such as caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods. Also, try to minimize the amount of sugar and carbohydrates you consume. These foods amplify the reproduction of oral bacteria.

If you smoke, consider using an oral rinse that replenishes moisture in the mouth. The chemicals in cigarette smoke are verey drying to oral tissues. Some oral rinses are specifically designed for producing moisture. Remember, oral dryness gives bacteria a favorable environment for reproduction.

When it comes to the initial formation of gingivitis, these steps will help relieve gum tenderness and potential to bleed within a week or so. If you do not see improvement after 2 weeks of diligent measures, see a periodontal specialist as soon as possible.

A periodontist is a dental specialist who can determine your precise level of gum disease and the most appropriate treatment to restore good oral health.

Call 828-274-9440 if you have questions about your gums or if you are experiencing any symptoms associated with gum disease.

 

Protect Your Heart. Start With Your Smile!


Posted on Jul 17, 2019 by William J. Claiborne, DDS MS

According to a report on the health of Americans (published by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, or ‘CDC’), it is estimated that over 47 percent have some form of gum disease. Although we all aspire to have a smile that is appealing, it is what lies beneath the teeth and gums that can reek havoc on one’s overall health.

Signs of gum disease

Over time, inadequate daily oral hygiene enables an overload of bacteria in the mouth. For people who have habits such as smoking, unhealthy diets, and alcohol consumption, their vulnerability is even more susceptible to this bacterial buildup.

This is also true for people as they age. Aging contributes to a reduced ability to produce saliva, the mouth’s oral rinsing agent. When saliva flow fails to ‘wash away’ bacteria at sufficient levels, the accumulation runs rampant.

Oral bacteria are living, eating, and reproducing organisms. They thrive on rotting food particles caught between teeth. They attack gum tissues and tooth enamel. Eventually, they can work their way down tooth roots and attack the bones and tendons that support teeth.

What’s even scarier is the fact that these infectious critters can enter the bloodstream. This potent bacteria are now associated with a number of serious health conditions due to their ability to trigger systemic inflammation.

When the gum tissues can no longer combat the onslaught of bacteria, there can be very few signs of periodontal (gum) disease initially. Signs that emerge are typically frequent bad breath along with swollen, tender and beefy red gums that bleed when you brush. As they grow in number, the gum tissues become weaker and they can penetrate the bloodstream.

According to the American Academy of Periodontology (www.perio.org),
“Several studies have shown that periodontal disease is associated with heart disease. While a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been proven, research has indicated that periodontal disease increases the risk of heart disease.
“Scientists believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the association.
“Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions. Patients at risk for infective endocarditis may require antibiotics prior to dental procedures. Your periodontist and cardiologist will be able to determine if your heart condition requires use of antibiotics prior to dental procedures.”

For this reason, cardiologists are more often advising their patients to be evaluated by a periodontist prior to heart surgery. As mentioned above, gums that bleed are a sign of gum disease. These oral bacteria, given an opportunity to enter the bloodstream, are able to travel anywhere, including the heart. They can reach the heart muscle and cause a severe infection.

For decades, researchers have probed the link between gum disease and cardiovascular health. People with gum disease (also known as periodontal disease) have two to three times the risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other serious cardiovascular event.

Acting as a contributing factor to heart disease is highly serious. Yet, the risks associated with gum disease don’t stop there. Research has shown this potent oral bacteria can set a path of destruction into motion. It has been linked to some cancers, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, preterm babies, impotency, and even Alzheimer’s.

Twice-daily brushing and daily flossing takes mere minutes and is inexpensive to do. Seeing a dentist every 6 months for oral exams and cleanings saves an individual far more by preventing problems than they cost. Yet, too many adults fail to devote the investment to this necessary part of a healthy lifestyle.

An estimated 65 percent of adults ages 18 – 64 see a dentist only once a year. Approximately 55 percent of adults brush their teeth twice a day, which is too little. (https://www.reference.com/health/many-times-day-people-brush-teeth-34d1104798029b7a) I believe it would be jolting to most adults to view dental floss under a microscope after their teeth have been flossed.

As an Asheville periodontal specialist, I have an up-close view of the damaging affects of insufficient oral hygiene. It often results in tooth loss, which is not a natural part of the aging process, as some people believe. Having your natural teeth for a lifetime is more than achievable and has even been shown to add to one’s lifespan (by up to ten years).

If you’ve failed to be fully committed to your oral health, there is no better time to begin than the present. Start with a thorough periodontal examination. Call 828-274-9440.

If dental fears have prevented you from having regular dental care, consider beginning with a consultation. This occurs in a comfortable, private consultation room that is removed from the clinical side of the office. This will be a friendly, informative conversation and you will not be asked to sit in a treatment chair during this visit.

Let’s protect you, top to bottom, beginning with your smile!

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